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The Adirondack Explorer is a nonprofit magazine covering the Adirondack Park's environment, recreation and communities.

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  1. Steven Leslie says

    I wonder if that kind of budget that conservation buyers–like the Nature Conservancy or Trust for Public Lands–can come up with. They can usually move quicker than a government, but don’t have the same level of resources.

  2. Boreas says

    $5000/acre. My feeling is let the family continue their excellent stewardship of the land until they come down on their price. I don’t see a developer spending that much for the property. Even if they did, development would need to pass APA permitting (ha).

  3. ADKMax says

    From the Times Union: “Hendrickson said that he would not consider selling to the state again, believing a private owner would offer better protection for the land. Prior to announcing the land was for sale, Hendrickson called Gov. Andrew Cuomo to tell him.

    “Little Tupper Lake was the home of brook trout,” Hendrickson said. “It was protected for more than 100 years. The state bought it and someone from the public introduced bass and now the trout are extinct from that lake. I have a hatchery with Little Tupper brook trout. I stock the lakes so they’re not completely extinct. I don’t want to see it happen again. It didn’t make me very happy.”

  4. ONNO OERLEMANS says

    His reason for not selling to the state seems kind of weak to me. The state also protects and stocks lakes for brook trout, and stocked fish, even heritage fish, hardly make a region or lake truly “wild”. And how is selling land for 180 million going to protect these fish in any case. Anyone individual who pays that kind of money is going to assume they can fish whatever they want in their lakes. Perhaps he’s just a crank, or this is just a phony reason for wanting to sell privately–the real reason being that private buyers might have deeper pockets.

  5. Peter says

    The state will loot and burn the buildings then gate the property from the public. It should stay in private stewardship.

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