About Gwendolyn Craig

Gwen is an award-winning journalist covering environmental policy for the Explorer since January 2020. She also takes photos and videos for the Explorer's magazine and website. She is a current member of the Legislative Correspondents Association of New York. Gwen has worked at various news outlets since 2015. Prior to moving to upstate New York, she worked for a D.C. Metro-area public relations firm, producing digital content for clients including the World Health Organization, the Low Income Investment Fund and Rights and Resources Initiative. She has a master's degree in journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. She has bachelor's degrees in English and journalism, with a concentration in ecology and evolutionary biology, from the University of Connecticut. Gwen is also a part-time figure skating coach. Contact her at (518) 524-2902 or gwen@adirondackexplorer.org. Sign up for Gwen’s newsletter here.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. nathan says

    Build the trails, let there be opportunities for all to enjoy the parks in a variety of methods and abilities. with millions of acres cutting a few acres of trees is not a significant loss. I would be more towards the eliminating of 2 stroke snowmobiles and reducing pollution. It get rediculous on how much court time and money is wasted on some of these matters.

  2. Gerhardt says

    A applaud Protect the Adirondacks position. To accommodate a small number of people with snowmobiles ,at the expense of preserving wilderness is a poor argument. For anyone who knows snowmobiles , and the people who ride them. It’s generally about the speed , horsepower, and how fast you can get from bar to bar. To justify these roads by saying they will accommodate people that can’t access these areas under their own power is ridiculous.
    There are many other spaces available where these types of activities could be accommodated that are outside the park.
    The philosophical aspect of what the Adirondacks represents is being lost. The noise pollution is something that disturbs me as a hiker.
    Try driving through Old Forge in the winter, the snowmobiles actually think they own the automobile roads.
    The smell is horrendous .The Adirondacks is such a unique and fragile resource. Sadly most are not aware, or interested in its history and environmental value.
    It’s a simple fix , under the Cuomo administration to bring revenue to the area. Maybe if our governor actually cared about upstate NY more sensible, and environmental friendly development would take place.

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