FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Climbing Crane With The King Of The Mountain

Jay Harrison lives at the base of Crane Mountain, but he probably spends more time on the mountain’s many cliffs than in his house. The guidebook Adirondack Rock devotes no less than seventy-three pages to the rock-climbing routes on Crane. This is thanks to Harrison, who has participated in about 350 first ascents in the Adirondacks—more than anyone else. Most of his routes are at Crane. He clearly is the king of the mountain. In 2013, veteran climber Don Mellor wrote a profile of Harrison for the Explorer. It’s well worth reading, both for Don’s writing and for understanding who >>More


Wednesday, July 12, 2017

St. Regis Mountain Fire Tower restoration continues

In late January, I visited the St. Regis Mountain fire tower with Doug Fitzgerald, co-chairman of Friends of St. Regis Mountain Fire Tower. The purpose of the visit was to check out the view from the tower, which had opened to the public in September, after being closed for decades. On Monday, July 10, Doug and other members of the Friend’s group held an informational meeting at Historic Saranac Lake to give an update on the restoration process. Although the tower opened up to the public in 2016, the Friends group still has more work to do in order to >>More


Friday, July 7, 2017

Bouldering On Baker: A Non-Routine Workout Routine

Baker Mountain on the edge of the village of Saranac Lake is one of the most popular peaks in the Adirondacks. Like many other local residents, I’ve hiked it countless times and thought I had seen it all. I was wrong. Will Roth recently made the hike to Baker’s summit more interesting for rock climbers: he has established a bouldering circuit of six “problems” (miniature climbing routes), all located just off the trail. It’s just one more example of why Saranac Lake is a cool place to live. Will says the challenge is to complete the circuit while hiking to >>More


Wednesday, July 5, 2017

The Thrill Of Climbing At Seneca Rocks

Seneca Rocks in West Virginia is billed as the only peak in the eastern United States that can’t be summited by a mere hike. You need (or should have) ropes, helmets, and other rock-climbing gear. If you ever have the chance to see Seneca Rocks close up, you’ll see why. Seneca actually has two peaks, North and South, with a U-shaped col between known as Gunsight Notch. Over the eons, the peaks have shed layers of rock, leaving only narrow ridges leading to the summits. In places, the ridge leading to South Peak is only a foot or two wide. >>More


Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Drone At The Flume

In May, I met up with Dave LaMountain at the Flume on the West Branch of the Ausable River in Wilmington. LaMountain demonstrated how he uses drones to showcase the beauty of the Adirondack Park. He is a believer that drones can co-exist with the Adirondack Park if their usage is limited to noisy frontcountry areas near roads. He doesn’t believe they should be used in Wilderness areas away from roads. Because drones are now becoming more popular, the state Department of Environmental Conservation is currently working on new regulations for drone usage in the Forest Preserve. To find out >>More