FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Friday, March 16, 2018

Skiing Coney Mountain

{"slide_to_show":"1","slide_to_scroll":"1","autoplay":"true","autoplay_speed":"5000","fade":"false","speed":"300","arrows":"true","dots":"true","loop":"true","nav_slide_column":"5","rtl":"false"}
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image
Slider Nav Image

Explorer Editor Phil Brown and I skied Coney Mountain yesterday as part of a daylong ski trip. Phil went on to ski all three mountains of the Tupper Lake Triad (Coney, Goodman, and Arab), while I skied the first two, before heading home for a family event.

The skiing on the 2,265-foot mountain was outstanding due to the recent snowfalls we’ve received in the past couple of weeks. Roughly a foot of fresh powder fell on the mountain in the prior 24 hours. That was important because normally you can’t ski Coney Mountain without being concerned about  hitting some of the larger rocks on the trail. The deep snow also made it easier to navigate the section of trail near the summit, where it is relatively steep.

Overall, the trip up Coney is a quick one. According to the TupperLake.com website, the elevation gain on the trip is 515 feet on the 1.1-mile trail. The website says it will take a family with kids about an hour to get to the top while an experienced hiker takes about 30 minutes to reach the summit. That sounds about right.

For people who are not familiar with the Tupper Lake Triad, it is a hiking challenge that was started several years ago. Because the mountains are all small and located in Tupper Lake, it’s possible to hike all three in a day. For more info about the challenge, visit the Tupper Lake Triad website

Keep up with news of the Park. Subscribe to the Adirondack Explorer today:https://goo.gl/PeuX5X

Mike Lynch

Mike Lynch is a staff writer and photographer for the nonprofit Adirondack Explorer, where he has been employed since 2014. Mike previously worked for the Adirondack Daily Enterprise, where he won numerous awards. He took home first place three times in the "beat reporting" category for coverage of the outdoors in New York State Associated Press Association and New York News Publisher Association contests. Mike’s favorite outdoor activities include paddling, hiking, fishing and backcountry skiing. In 2011, he paddled the 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail from Old Forge to Fort Kent, Maine, and made a 40-minute documentary about the trip.

Mike can be reached at mike@adirondackexplorer.org.

Leave a Reply