About Ry Rivard

Ry covers water for the Explorer. Before coming to New York, he reported on water and energy for Voice of San Diego.
He can be reached at [email protected]

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Boreas says

    There isn’t much that would contribute to the economy of the Saranac watershed by removing unnecessary dams and adding fish ladders to others. Utility companies that profit on our watersheds should be able to contribute significantly to the effort, or we should seriously consider if the utility gains are WORTH the habitat loss. It isn’t impossible to have both generation and passage of natural fauna and enhancement of natural habitat throughout this watershed.

  2. Duckbutter says

    Thanks for the article. It sounds like there are some good opportunities to reevaluate these dams. While hydroelectric power doesn’t contribute to greenhouse gases, it’s impact on local aquatic ecosystems and charismatic game fish can be devastating. We shouldn’t just think of dams as providers of “clean” energy anymore. It’s more complicated.

  3. Boreas says

    I used to live there – very familiar with it! I can’t say I have ever read about it though. In re-reading my comment above, I realize I left out a couple important words. I meant to write “There isn’t much that would contribute MORE to the economy of the Saranac watershed THAN by removing unnecessary dams and adding fish ladders to others.” Sorry for the confusion!

  4. Boreas says

    Sorry. My first post above should read “There isn’t much that would contribute MORE to the economy of the Saranac watershed THAN by removing unnecessary dams and adding fish ladders to others.” Big difference. Thanks Ben!

  5. dwnhllracer9 says

    Dealing with NY State on issues involving water and/or dams usually takes about 200 years. And then, nothing is solved. Massena, NY for example: A dam below the bridge [Grass River] by the old mica plant self destructed many, many years ago. Restoring it would have been relatively simple. I recall in the 40’s – 60’s the river was home to rock sturgeon, pike and occasional musky and bass. It had a few swimming holes, migrating birds and small watercraft. I had caught numerous fish there as a child. Now it is a dead river. All that is gone. N’uff said.

  6. Jeffrey Snyder says

    Nice article…the Saranac River has the potential to be a truly great resource for the area, even if I only get to visit it seasonally.

    Keep up the good reportage!

  7. Kevin says

    I believe during labor say weekend 2021 and August 2021 Franklin Falls was seemingly out of control. Some of the lowest I’ve seen, and then a quick rise to be lowered overnight again. How can they say they aren’t sure who’s fault it is, especially with fluctuations that drastic.

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