About Gwendolyn Craig

Gwen is an award-winning journalist covering environmental policy for the Explorer since January 2020. She also takes photos and videos for the Explorer's magazine and website. She is a current member of the Legislative Correspondents Association of New York. Gwen has worked at various news outlets since 2015. Prior to moving to upstate New York, she worked for a D.C. Metro-area public relations firm, producing digital content for clients including the World Health Organization, the Low Income Investment Fund and Rights and Resources Initiative. She has a master's degree in journalism from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. She has bachelor's degrees in English and journalism, with a concentration in ecology and evolutionary biology, from the University of Connecticut. Gwen is also a part-time figure skating coach. Contact her at (518) 524-2902 or gwen@adirondackexplorer.org. Sign up for Gwen’s newsletter here.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Zephyr says

    I go hiking to get away from it all. Reservations and fees turn a wilderness outing into what many of us would like to avoid for a little while. I suppose they are successful in keeping people like me away, which is what they want to do. I will go elsewhere.

  2. Paul says

    “AMR public safety offer Mitch Ryan was on duty last May to make sure hikers had permits before entering the Adirondack Mountain Reserve property.”

    A person working for a private entity making sure that people have permits to use public property (the easement across AMR to get to forest preserve land is owned by NYS)? That’s kind of weird.

  3. TooFarGone says

    The AMR permit system is an elitist approach foisted on the public on behalf of the privileged AMR refugees who disdain public access over private AMR lands subject to public conservation easements that is fully supported by Basil Seggos, DEC zealots, and the Green Mafia, who would rather bulldoze trenches around Boreas Ponds than allow the public to access the old timber roads. Does anyone have an extra bus ticket they want to sell for this weekend, and what about the empty spots in the AMR parking lot? Traffic and pedestrian safety, oh my! But they’ll tell you there were a number of near misses – for sure.

  4. Ryan says

    Good call out by Gwen that future reports on AMR program should include feedback from those unable to get permits. Many people in today’s economy don’t know two weeks in advance when their day off will be. I’m in IT and if my project is finished I can take time off, If it’s not I can’t. Many of my friends work in retail, restaurants, etc and their schedule isn’t ever posted more than a week out. Permit systems cut out entire segments of the population from being able to hike.

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