FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Natural History’ Category

May, 2019

DEC Announces 2019 ‘I Bird NY’ Challenges


In conjunction with World Migratory Bird Day (May 11th), the New York State Department of Environment Conservation (DEC) announced the start of the 2019 “I Bird NY” challenges for beginner and experienced birders. I Bird NY was launched in 2017. New York is home to a wide array of habitats that support more than 450 different bird species. There are also 59 Bird Conservation Areas across the state. Bird watching is one of the fastest growing outdoor recreational activities that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and experiences in any community. DEC is hosting its annual » Continue >>More


May, 2019

Adirondack Wild Calls For Action On Spruce Grouse


On Endangered Species Day, May 17, Adirondack Wild is renewed its call for the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to protect the endangered spruce grouse, which occupies a few select areas in the Adirondack Park. The spruce grouse requires specialized habitat in low-elevation boreal woods and wetlands which in New York State are found only in the Adirondack Park. According to DEC’s 2012 Spruce Grouse Recovery Plan, the species is restricted to just 15 scattered populations in the Adirondack Park, nine of which are concentrated in the Raquette-Boreal area west of the Carry Falls Reservoir. These isolated areas of >>More


May, 2019

Curious Creatures: Remarkable Taxidermy from Private Collections


Adirondack Experience, the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake is set to exhibit approximately 100 pieces of taxidermy on loan from private Adirondack collections and camps as well as mounts, photographs, and manuscript materials from its own collection. This special temporary exhibit opening May 24, 2019 for one season only, will include the work of famed English taxidermist Walter Potter (1835-1918). Two of his pieces will be on exhibit at the ADKX for the first time in the United States. Rabbits’ Village School, 1888 and Monkey Riding the Goat. Taxidermy animals and animal parts have long been used as camp décor >>More


May, 2019

Invasive Lanternfly May Be Vulnerable To Native Fungi


The season of daylight and blooming flowers has finally arrived. But, along with the emergence of all things green, comes the emergence of all sorts of flies, bugs, mites, worms, and mollusks. Many of these are unwelcome home, garden, and agricultural pests which, as the weather continues to warm, will only become more active. Early season leaf- and plant-feeding insects are on every grower’s mind. And this year, grape growers, orchardists, nursery operators, home-gardeners, and others are advised to be aware of the potential for the appearance of yet another invasive pest from Asia. Lycorma delicatula, the spotted lanternfly (SLF), >>More


May, 2019

Marshland Life of the American Bittern


Often, when I spot an interesting bird, I don’t have my binoculars handy. I’m holding a paddle or a pair of bicycle handlebars, which aren’t very helpful when it comes to birdwatching. That was the case during an early-morning bike ride last summer, when I noticed a brownish bird about the size of a chicken standing at the edge of a farm pond. I would have liked a better look, but it was clearly an American bittern, scanning for prey against a backdrop of reeds and cattails. It was a rare sighting for me, one I was lucky to have. >>More


May, 2019

Peregrine Falcon Recovery Continues


There is a broad, craggy precipice in Franconia Notch, NH, not far from my home, called Eagle Cliff. It was named in the 1800s for the golden eagles that nested there, back when the region was full of open farmland that was conducive to the giant raptors’ lifestyle. While the fields have grown up and the eagles are long gone, the cliff has been home to nesting peregrine falcons each year since 1981. Once completely absent from the eastern United States, peregrine falcons have been making a steady comeback since the 1980s. Those falcons that nested on Eagle Cliff in >>More


May, 2019

Pollinator Symposium Set For June


AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to hold a Pollinator Symposium June 5 at Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek, on Wednesday, June 5th, from 10 am to 4 pm. The Pollinator Symposium will be aimed at equipping farmers, groundskeepers, public park managers, gardeners, and local government agencies with the knowledge to help preserve and build pollinator populations in the Adirondacks.  The event’s keynote speaker will be author and garden designer Benjamin Vogt. Sarah Foltz Jordan, Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist from Xerces Society, will present Pollinator Habitat Restoration Using Organic Site Preparation Methods.  Jay Burney, Special Projects Director and >>More


May, 2019

Birding, Banding at Crown Point Historic Site


The Crown Point Bird Banding Association will set up its yearly bird banding station at the Crown Point State Historic Site May 10 through May 25. In its 44th year, the Crown Point banding station returns to record migration data and birdsongs, and the public is invited to observe and learn more 6 am to 6 pm daily. Bird banding is an effort to identify and track different species of migratory birds that pass through the region every year, so as to better collect ecological data and improve conservation efforts.  The public can watch the netting and banding process, learn >>More


May, 2019

Celebrate Spring by Planting Natives for Pollinators


AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project has announced its second Pollinator Plant Sale. With the assistance of Cook & Gardener Nursery, these native pollinator plants and cultivars have been selected to thrive in the Adirondacks. The plants have been sourced or grown from seed to ensure that they are free of neonicotinoids, a class of systemic insecticide that research shows is a major factor in Colony Collapse Disorder and loss of pollinator biodiversity. Pollinator gardens planted by homeowners provide critical habitat for hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees in the Adirondacks, and native species or close cultivars are the best choice to help native >>More


May, 2019

What Shall We Call This?


Anyone who’s spent time in the woods has seen them, a tree growing on top of a large stone or boulder, with its roots winding down around the stone to find nourishment, finally, in the surrounding earth. The tree could be a yellow birch or a spruce and we see them in many stages of their lives from seedlings growing out of a bed of moss and ferns to very mature trees. They are one of the great curiosities of the woods, often causing one to stop and examine, marveling at » Continue Reading. View original post.