July, 2017

Adirondack Moose Caught On Candid Camera


It seems that photos of moose are becoming more common with the return of these magnificent creatures to the Adirondacks. Last week, Jeff Nadler, a professional photographer, sent us a shot of a young moose he took near Great Sacandaga Lake in the southern Adirondacks. Today I’m sharing a photo of another young moose taken by a trail camera near Otter Lake in the southwestern Adirondacks. Joshua Bader set up two trail cameras just a few weeks ago on his property at a “pinch point” between a pond and a big marsh. Evidently, it’s a busy pathway for wildlife, as >>More


July, 2017

Mountaineer’s New Sign Is A Work Of Art


When Matt Horner, one of the region’s best ice climbers, fell on a route at Chapel Pond last winter, he had to stop working for a while. For Matt, work is guiding and sculpting, usually in rock and metal. Matt has recuperated well enough to resume his artwork, and his latest piece was unveiled Thursday evening at the Mountaineer in Keene Valley. It’s a nine-foot ice ax modeled on the Piolet d’Or, awarded in France to a mountaineer each year. Horner’s giant ax is mounted on a truncated cedar tree mounted on a large boulder. The Mountaineer’s sign hangs from the >>More


July, 2017

Lucky Photographer Sees Another Adirondack Moose


The historian Philip Terrie has written a book on Adirondack mammals, but he has never seen a moose in the Adirondacks. He is not alone. Although as many as a thousand moose (no one knows for sure) live in the Adirondack Park, you have to be lucky to see one. Jeff Nadler, a nature photographer from outside Saratoga Springs, is one of the lucky ones. He took the above photo last weekend in the town of Edinburg near Great Sacandaga Lake. He and his wife were driving on Fox Hill Road. “As we stopped and parked, the moose actually started >>More


July, 2017

Climbing Crane With The King Of The Mountain


Jay Harrison lives at the base of Crane Mountain, but he probably spends more time on the mountain’s many cliffs than in his house. The guidebook Adirondack Rock devotes no less than seventy-three pages to the rock-climbing routes on Crane. This is thanks to Harrison, who has participated in about 350 first ascents in the Adirondacks—more than anyone else. Most of his routes are at Crane. He clearly is the king of the mountain. In 2013, veteran climber Don Mellor wrote a profile of Harrison for the Explorer. It’s well worth reading, both for Don’s writing and for understanding who >>More


July, 2017

Climbers Encounter Bear Near Chapel Pond


Rock-climbing guide Will Roth was rappelling down a cliff near Chapel Pond with two clients this week when they saw a bear below—climbing toward them. The climbers yelled and clapped their hands, but the bear kept coming, its claws scratching the rock like fingernails on chalkboard. When the bear got within fifteen feet, Roth tossed a small rock and struck its shoulder. The bear seemed unfazed but nevertheless wandered away. “It walked off the side of the slab into the trees and then reappeared. It was standing at the top of the slab, staring back down at us,” Roth said. >>More


July, 2017

Federal Employee Rescued At Boreas Ponds


One item that caught our eye in the latest forest ranger report was the rescue of a U.S. Forest Service employee near Boreas Ponds. The federal employee activated a personal locator beacon after his vehicle got stuck near Boreas Ponds. Here is the item in the ranger report in its entirety:  “Call for Assistance: On June 27 at 11 a.m., the International Emergency Response Center (IERC) notified Ray Brook Dispatch of a personal locator beacon (PLB) activated by a U.S. Forest Service employee working in Essex County. PLBs use satellite communication to notify the IERC that the owner of the >>More


July, 2017

Bouldering On Baker: A Non-Routine Workout Routine


Baker Mountain on the edge of the village of Saranac Lake is one of the most popular peaks in the Adirondacks. Like many other local residents, I’ve hiked it countless times and thought I had seen it all. I was wrong. Will Roth recently made the hike to Baker’s summit more interesting for rock climbers: he has established a bouldering circuit of six “problems” (miniature climbing routes), all located just off the trail. It’s just one more example of why Saranac Lake is a cool place to live. Will says the challenge is to complete the circuit while hiking to >>More


July, 2017

Should Campfires Be Banned In Forest Preserve?


Last weekend I was returning from Nubble Cliff in the Giant Mountain Wilderness when I passed a tent on the southeast shore of the Giant’s Washbowl and heard someone breaking branches or dead trees, presumably gathering wood for a campfire. Campfires are an Adirondack tradition. Who doesn’t like a fire when sleeping under the stars? Nevertheless, I couldn’t help thinking that this was not good for the environment. Rather, it was destructive. The state Department of Environmental Conservation banned campfires in the eastern High Peaks for a reason. Over time, campers collecting wood left patches of forest virtually denuded. DEC >>More


July, 2017

The Thrill Of Climbing At Seneca Rocks


Seneca Rocks in West Virginia is billed as the only peak in the eastern United States that can’t be summited by a mere hike. You need (or should have) ropes, helmets, and other rock-climbing gear. If you ever have the chance to see Seneca Rocks close up, you’ll see why. Seneca actually has two peaks, North and South, with a U-shaped col between known as Gunsight Notch. Over the eons, the peaks have shed layers of rock, leaving only narrow ridges leading to the summits. In places, the ridge leading to South Peak is only a foot or two wide. >>More


Page 1 of 5012345...102030...Last »