About Zachary Matson

Zachary Matson has been an environmental reporter for the Explorer since October 2021. He is focused on the many issues impacting water and the people, plants and wildlife that rely on it in the Adirondack Park. Zach worked at daily newspapers in Missouri, Arizona and New York for nearly a decade, most recently working as the education reporter for six years at the Daily Gazette in Schenectady.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. Ginger Henry Kuenzel says

    This is a well-researched and informative article. Ensuring that property owners understand the need for this protective measure will be critical for the success of any inspection program and for the future of a clean Lake George. Thank you for helping to inform the public and raise awarness about the issues and potential solutions.

  2. Worth Gretter says

    What no one is mentioning, and what all Lake George property owners should consider, is that property values will take a dive if algal blooms are not controlled.

    Does anyone who owns a lakefront property on Lake George want to see their million dollar investment cut in half?

    If not, they better get behind the effort to fix faulty septic systems!

  3. Susan W says

    This proposal is a first important step, to make sure a septic system is working upon property transfer. The next step will be to require periodic inspections. And finally, the elephant in the room is the increasing proliferation of day-rental pontoon boats filled with people. Where do they poop, do you think???

  4. Stuart says

    Another well researched, factual, timely, and informative article on this important topic. My only suggestion for future articles is to add more historical context, to help readers understand how long this problem has been building for:

    Change this:

    The south end of lake George has sought to address spikes in E. coli bacteria, including one that closed a popular beach near this spot in June

    To This:

    The south end of lake George has sought to address spikes in E. coli bacteria, including one that closed a popular beach near this spot in June, as well as dozens of times since 2008.

  5. Dick Gunthert says

    Did you know that e-coli in lakes can be tested for DNA and if is human or not can be determined? Before assuming it is human it should be tested.

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