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  1. Todd Eastman says

    Frequently highway departments bring in knotweed contaminated soil for repairs of culverts and bridges.

    Mowing knotweed along roads adjacent to streams and lakes also spreads knotweed.

    Highway departments need to update their best practices or start dedicating funds and labor to reduce their role on spreading this invasive plant…

    • Boreas says

      Agree! Seems like a portion of the Environmental Bond Act funds could be used to hire summer help attached to highway departments in problem areas to educate full-time workers and mark or eliminate roadside infestations prior to first mowing – at least in sensitive areas. If we can’t eradicate it, perhaps we could at least slow the spread until we can.

  2. JB says

    We have introduced most of these species deliberately, while removing (or extirpating) native species. As a result, eastern North America is one of the most heavily impacted regions in the world by invasives. Shifting some of our land-use patterns — minimizing ecosystem disturbance — will do more good than all of the herbicide in the world.

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