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Adirondack Explorer

Monday, June 3, 2019

Adirondack Pollinator Symposium Wednesday in North Creek

AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to hold a Pollinator Symposium on June 5 at Tannery Pond Community Center, 228 Main Street in North Creek. The Symposium will be aimed at equipping farmers, groundskeepers, public park managers, gardeners, and local government agencies with the knowledge to help preserve and build crucial pollinator populations in the Adirondacks. Benjamin Vogt, author of A New Garden Ethic, will be keynote speaker. Vogt is known for empowering advice on creating sustainable wildlife habitats in everyday settings such as parks, yards, roadsides, and gardens. Besides Vogt, Sarah Foltz Jordan, Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist from Xerces >>More


Saturday, June 1, 2019

Welcome Infestations: Dragonflies and Damselflies

It is not too often one hears about a good-news infestation. I’d like to come across a bulletin on a new invasive money-tree that was poised to spread through the region. Granted it would produce in foreign currency, but we could make peace with that situation, I imagine. A money-tree invasion is unlikely, but some areas will soon be overrun by hordes of insects programmed to eat black flies, mosquitoes and deer flies. Dragonflies and damselflies, carnivorous insects in the order Odonata, date back more than 300 million years. Both kinds of insects are beneficial in that » Continue Reading. >>More


Wednesday, May 29, 2019

How Flood Waters Impact Trees

As a teenager, my son had a saying, whether original or borrowed I don’t know (the saying, that is), which went something like “All things in moderation. Especially moderation.” It would seem Mother Nature took that to heart, and dispensed with moderate rainfall and snow melt this spring. If not her, then maybe it was Creepy Uncle Climate Change. At any rate, the resultant flooding has been heartbreaking to observe. While I am of course sensitive to the anguish of those people affected by the record-high waters, as an arborist I cannot help but think about the » Continue Reading. >>More


Sunday, May 26, 2019

Life, Death, and Black Flies

I was in southern Connecticut a few weeks back to pick my son up from college. While he took his last exam, I took myself up a local hiking trail. Connecticut black flies are as bad as their Vermont cousins, and I brushed several of the little beasts out from under my hairline. It can be hard to think of these biting flies with anything but disdain, but they do serve important ecological functions. And in at least one case, they also solved a murder. Black fly larvae are little, black, and shaped like bowling pins. They live in rivers >>More


Wednesday, May 22, 2019

DEC Announces 2019 ‘I Bird NY’ Challenges

In conjunction with World Migratory Bird Day (May 11th), the New York State Department of Environment Conservation (DEC) announced the start of the 2019 “I Bird NY” challenges for beginner and experienced birders. I Bird NY was launched in 2017. New York is home to a wide array of habitats that support more than 450 different bird species. There are also 59 Bird Conservation Areas across the state. Bird watching is one of the fastest growing outdoor recreational activities that can be enjoyed by people of all ages and experiences in any community. DEC is hosting its annual » Continue >>More


Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Adirondack Wild Calls For Action On Spruce Grouse

On Endangered Species Day, May 17, Adirondack Wild is renewed its call for the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to protect the endangered spruce grouse, which occupies a few select areas in the Adirondack Park. The spruce grouse requires specialized habitat in low-elevation boreal woods and wetlands which in New York State are found only in the Adirondack Park. According to DEC’s 2012 Spruce Grouse Recovery Plan, the species is restricted to just 15 scattered populations in the Adirondack Park, nine of which are concentrated in the Raquette-Boreal area west of the Carry Falls Reservoir. These isolated areas of >>More


Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Curious Creatures: Remarkable Taxidermy from Private Collections

Adirondack Experience, the Museum on Blue Mountain Lake is set to exhibit approximately 100 pieces of taxidermy on loan from private Adirondack collections and camps as well as mounts, photographs, and manuscript materials from its own collection. This special temporary exhibit opening May 24, 2019 for one season only, will include the work of famed English taxidermist Walter Potter (1835-1918). Two of his pieces will be on exhibit at the ADKX for the first time in the United States. Rabbits’ Village School, 1888 and Monkey Riding the Goat. Taxidermy animals and animal parts have long been used as camp décor >>More


Monday, May 20, 2019

Invasive Lanternfly May Be Vulnerable To Native Fungi

The season of daylight and blooming flowers has finally arrived. But, along with the emergence of all things green, comes the emergence of all sorts of flies, bugs, mites, worms, and mollusks. Many of these are unwelcome home, garden, and agricultural pests which, as the weather continues to warm, will only become more active. Early season leaf- and plant-feeding insects are on every grower’s mind. And this year, grape growers, orchardists, nursery operators, home-gardeners, and others are advised to be aware of the potential for the appearance of yet another invasive pest from Asia. Lycorma delicatula, the spotted lanternfly (SLF), >>More


Sunday, May 19, 2019

Marshland Life of the American Bittern

Often, when I spot an interesting bird, I don’t have my binoculars handy. I’m holding a paddle or a pair of bicycle handlebars, which aren’t very helpful when it comes to birdwatching. That was the case during an early-morning bike ride last summer, when I noticed a brownish bird about the size of a chicken standing at the edge of a farm pond. I would have liked a better look, but it was clearly an American bittern, scanning for prey against a backdrop of reeds and cattails. It was a rare sighting for me, one I was lucky to have. >>More


Thursday, May 16, 2019

Peregrine Falcon Recovery Continues

There is a broad, craggy precipice in Franconia Notch, NH, not far from my home, called Eagle Cliff. It was named in the 1800s for the golden eagles that nested there, back when the region was full of open farmland that was conducive to the giant raptors’ lifestyle. While the fields have grown up and the eagles are long gone, the cliff has been home to nesting peregrine falcons each year since 1981. Once completely absent from the eastern United States, peregrine falcons have been making a steady comeback since the 1980s. Those falcons that nested on Eagle Cliff in >>More