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Adirondack Explorer

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Bullheads: The Humble Hornpouts

Consider for a second a fish that can live in turbid, low-oxygen water. Can breathe through its skin. Eats almost anything. Has a wickedly effective defense mechanism. And is a really focused parent. Plus, it’s good to eat. We’re talking about the humble hornpout. Or “horned pout,” if you prefer. Or “mud cat.” Taxonomically, Ameiurus nebulosus. The brown bullhead. The hornpout is a catfish that ranges from near the Hudson Bay in the north to the Gulf of Mexico in the south and from the Atlantic coast westward into the nation’s midsection. The fish can be found in even more >>More


Sunday, June 23, 2019

Questions Remain In Controlling Spotted Lantern Fly

Have you seen a spotted lanternfly? If you live in New England, and answered “no,” that’s good. But we’ll have to check back with you next year. The lanternfly is one of the latest foreign invasive insect pests to become established in North America. And it isn’t a picky eater. Dozens of crops and native trees are go-to foods for this destructive bug. While it apparently hasn’t made it to this region yet, it is entrenched farther south. Entomologists are watching nervously. “For landowners and orchards they’re a nightmare … a total menace to society,” said Judy Rosovsky, the Vermont >>More


Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Tick Crisis in the Adirondacks Panel June 25th

The Whallonsburg Grange is set to present a panel discussion on the growing problem of ticks on Tuesday, June 25 at 7:30 pm. “A Ticking Time Bomb: The Tick Crisis in the Adirondacks” will include the latest scientific and medical information and time for participants to tell their own stories. With an estimated 52,000 new cases of Lyme disease in New York State in 2017 and new tick-borne diseases appearing, the concern about ticks is growing. Despite this urgent public health crisis, the state legislature quietly cut the funding for research and education on tick-borne diseases from the state » >>More


Monday, June 17, 2019

History of Champlain Salmon Focus of Ti Exhibit

The Ticonderoga Historical Society has opened the exhibit “Salmon and People,” set to run through June 21, with a free public program on Friday, June 21 at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle, Ticonderoga. Provided by the Champlain Valley National Heritage Partnership, the exhibit celebrates 2019 as the “International Year of the Salmon.” The free public program at 7 pm on June 21 will feature speaker Dr. William Ardren, Senior Fish Biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region. Ardren has been at the forefront of research and efforts to overcome multiple conservation problems. These are as far >>More


Sunday, June 16, 2019

No Evidence of Native Cougars in the Adirondacks

Before the 19th century, cougars were abundant across the American continent. In fact, the cougar was the most widely distributed land mammal in the Western Hemisphere. They were found in forests from tropical to boreal; from Chile to the Canadian Yukon. A lion living in the Arizona desert may appear different than one living in the coniferous forests of British Columbia or the freshwater marshes of Florida, but genetically, they’re the same animal, Puma concolor. Taxonomists classify cougars from different regions by subspecies, however. Examples are the North American cougar, Eastern cougar, Western » Continue Reading. View original post.


Saturday, June 15, 2019

Wild Turkey Nests

Last June I was walking through our field when I flushed a wild turkey hen. She emerged from the raspberry patch just a few feet away from me. I parted the thorny canes to reveal a nest on the ground lined with dried grass and containing nine large, creamy eggs, speckled with brown. Since we were planning to have the field mown to control invasive wild chervil, I set stakes topped with orange flagging near the nest. The man we had hired to mow was a turkey hunter, and he was happy to give the nest a wide berth. The >>More


Wednesday, June 12, 2019

DEC Asks Public to Report Moose Sightings

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has asked the public to report moose sightings and observations. DEC and its research partners use these public sightings as indices of moose distribution and abundance in New York. This is part of a multi-year research project to obtain information on the status of New York State’s moose population, health of the moose, and the factors that influence moose survival and reproductive rate. Moose sightings increase in the spring with the rising temperatures and melting snow. As cows prepare to give birth to the current year’s calf, the previous » Continue >>More


Wednesday, June 5, 2019

It’s Hummingbird Season

I’ve always been fascinated by ruby-throated hummingbirds (Archilochus colubris), the only hummingbird species to regularly breed in eastern North America. They’re small hummingbirds with slender, slightly curved, black bills, fairly short wings that don’t reach all the way to their tails when sitting, and strikingly radiant iridescent feathers that change in intensity and hue, depending upon the light and your angle of view. All ruby-throated hummingbirds; males, females, and immature birds; flaunt bright emerald- or golden-green on their backs and crowns, with a dull white or pale gray breast. Only the male brandishes the intensely lustrous ruby-red » Continue Reading. >>More


Tuesday, June 4, 2019

What’s That Sound? The Gray Tree Frog

Spring is a season when the greatest abundance of natural sounds echo across the landscape. During the day, birds are primarily responsible for the variety of musical calls; however as darkness approaches, especially when the weather is mild, the voices of amphibians produce our most captivating sounds. Around the alder-laden shores of ponds, marshes and rivers, choruses of tiny spring peepers regularly drown out the songs sung by all other creatures. During the latter part of May, after dusk, toads can be seen heading to similar shallow wooded waterways to engage in their nocturnal serenade. Around Memorial Day, if the >>More


Monday, June 3, 2019

Adirondack Pollinator Symposium Wednesday in North Creek

AdkAction’s Adirondack Pollinator Project is set to hold a Pollinator Symposium on June 5 at Tannery Pond Community Center, 228 Main Street in North Creek. The Symposium will be aimed at equipping farmers, groundskeepers, public park managers, gardeners, and local government agencies with the knowledge to help preserve and build crucial pollinator populations in the Adirondacks. Benjamin Vogt, author of A New Garden Ethic, will be keynote speaker. Vogt is known for empowering advice on creating sustainable wildlife habitats in everyday settings such as parks, yards, roadsides, and gardens. Besides Vogt, Sarah Foltz Jordan, Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist from Xerces >>More