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Adirondack Explorer

Monday, October 30, 2017

New Book Tells History Of Park’s African-Americans

It’s obvious to anyone who spends time here that the vast majority of people who live in or visit the Adirondack Park are white. This could have consequences for the Forest Preserve, because the Preserve belongs to all New Yorkers and its future is in their hands. The latest census data indicate that about 18 percent of the state’s population is African-American (another 19 percent is Hispanic or Latino). Although few African-Americans live in the Adirondacks, our region is not without its own black history. Most people will think of John Brown’s farm in North Elba and Gerrit Smith’s effort >>More


Sunday, October 29, 2017

Lake George History Roundtable Planned

Historians, cultural and environmental groups, museums, and community members are invited to a roundtable discussion that highlights the Lake George region communities and their stories on Friday, November 3, 2017, from 10 am to 3 pm, at the Bolton Historical Museum at 4924 Lake Shore Drive, Bolton Landing. Participants will discuss topics such as the history, photographic collections, and environmental stewardship of the region. Participants will identify what is visible in the landscape related to these topics, the stories of the people, the sites and events to visit, and what resources can be found in libraries and museum collections. Lake >>More


Saturday, October 28, 2017

A Short History The Sacandaga Canal Project

With the opening of the entire Erie Canal in 1825, a call for more canals and other internal improvements arose from all over New York State. People in many legislative districts thought that if the state could build a canal that had already shown its great value, it could also provide infrastructure projects to help regional economies to connect with the artificial river that joined the interior Great Lakes and the global market through Albany and New York City. This was also the case coming from the legislative representatives from Montgomery County and although many lateral canals would be subsequently >>More


Saturday, October 28, 2017

Postal History of World War One Program in Ticonderoga

The Ticonderoga Historical Society has invited the public to a free program focusing on the Postal Service in World War One, on Friday, November 3 at 7 pm. Featured speaker will be Glenn Estus, President of the Vermont Philatelic Society. As part of the overall support for U.S. Entry into World War One, The United States Post Office Department participated in efforts to help raise funds. One method included cancelling mail with slogans that encouraged Americans to buy Liberty Loans. The United States was not alone in this effort, and this program will also show how allied nations such as >>More


Saturday, October 28, 2017

A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War

A companion catalog to the New York State Museum exhibition of the same name, Aaron Noble’s new book A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War (SUNY Press, 2017) documents the statewide story of New York in World War I through the collections of the New York State Museum, Library, and Archives. Within the collections are the nearly 3,600 posters of the Benjamin W. Arnold World War I Poster Collection at the New York State Library. The book interweaves the story of New York in the Great War with some of these posters, and artifacts from >>More


Monday, October 23, 2017

Adirondack Witchcraft? Sarah Bennett’s Babies in Hope, NY

This story is about as bizarre as it gets. Locals in the Wells and Northville area were privy to the odd situation when it first came under public scrutiny a little over a century ago. At that time, a goal of regional counties seeking tourism dollars was providing easier public access to the Adirondacks, which was achieved in part by building new roads and improving old ones. In southeastern Hamilton County, Northville marked the end of rail access in 1910. From there, stage lines carried visitors north through the hamlet of Hope to Wells and beyond. To accommodate automobiles, which >>More


Monday, October 23, 2017

GEM Radio Halloween Production Set For North Creek

Gem Radio Theatre will present “Horrors You Can Hear” on Friday, October 27 at 7 pm at Tannery Pond Community Center in North Creek and Saturday, October 28 at 7 pm at Indian Lake Theater in Indian Lake. The theatre group will reimagine three classic radio thrillers from favorites such as “Lights Out” and “Quiet Please” not just as a live performance in true-old radio style, but as a shadow play, believed the first presentation of its kind in the Adirondack region. While actors bring these eerie episodes to life through shadow and voice, foley artists will perform sound effects >>More


Saturday, October 21, 2017

A Great Pumpkin Prank; Pumpkin Production In NYS

McGraw Hall, Cornell University’s first building, is certainly the most recognizable symbol of the University and, arguably, one of the state’s most iconic buildings. Built in 1891 and named for Jennie McGraw, a close family friend of University co-founder, Ezra Cornell. McGraw Hall’s clock tower, which houses the 21-bell Cornell Chimes; played three times a day and heard all over campus, stands 173-feet-tall, with an extremely steep 20-foot-high tiled roof-spire. It holds a commanding presence from vantage points all around the city of Ithaca. So, on the morning of October 8, 1997, Cornell students, faculty, and staff were baffled when they >>More


Tuesday, October 17, 2017

A Fisher of Men and a Fish in the Water

A few weeks ago, the Adirondacks and North Country lost a native who led a unique life, a man who three years ago added “author” to his resume. Robert “Bob” Manning of Massena passed away on September 28 at the age of 81. My personal connection with him is a strange one indeed. We met back in 1966, but I hadn’t been in touch with him since 1969, so you might suppose that our phone conversation in 2014, when we became reacquainted, might have been a bit awkward. It sure could have been, but not for the reason you might >>More


Tuesday, October 17, 2017

New Exhibit On Water At Chapman Museum

The Chapman Museum in Glens Falls has announced a new fall exhibit, H2O: A Brief History of our Relationship to Water, which will open October 19th with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30 pm. H2O examines the historical uses of water in the Glens Falls region from the mid-19th century, when people depended on private wells, to the present day. It explores the development of a municipal water supply after the Glens Falls fire of 1864, the transition from water power to electrical generators on the Hudson River, the role of the river and the Feeder Canal » Continue Reading. View >>More




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