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Adirondack Explorer

Monday, October 22, 2018

Hudson River History: The 1903 Spier Falls Disaster (Conclusion)

In spring 1903, more than a thousand men were at work on the final stages of the Spier Falls hydropower project. A large number of skilled Italian masons and stoneworkers were housed in a shantytown on the Warren County (north) side of the river. Most of the remaining work was on the Saratoga County (south) side, which they accessed by a temporary bridge. But the company feared that the high waters of springtime had made the bridge unsafe. To avert a potential catastrophe, they destroyed it with dynamite. After that, crossing the river was achieved about a half-mile downstream from >>More


Monday, October 22, 2018

Shady Characters: Paul Hetzler On Nature

Regular Adirondack Almanack contributor Paul Hetzler is the author of a new book of nature essays, Shady Characters: Plant Vampires, Caterpillar Soup, Leprechaun Trees and Other Hilarities of the Natural World (Lexingford Publishing, 2018). Paul Hetzler knows all about nature in all its wonders, complexities, and hilarities, and weaves considerable wit with a range of wisdom. A Canton, NY-based arborist, educator and writer, Hetzler says he had intended to be a bear when he grew up, but failed the audition. He settled for an educator position instead, and serves as Horticulture and Natural Resources Educator at Cornell Cooperative Extension of >>More


Sunday, October 21, 2018

High Peaks Happy Hour: Valcour Brewing Company, Plattsburgh

Ulysses S. Grant drank here. Maybe. Originally built in 1838 as an army barracks for enlisted men, known as Old Stone Barracks, the grand building on Ohio Avenue in Plattsburgh is now home to Valcour Brewing Company. Though Grant is reported to have stayed in the officers’ barracks that once stood adjacent in the mid 1800s, it’s possible he may have sat on the porch of the Old Stone Barracks swilling beer and swapping stories with the enlisted men. Even if Grant didn’t drink here, Valcour Brewing Company can openly boast that Kim and Pam Ladd drank here – twice >>More


Saturday, October 20, 2018

Poetry: Pledge

Pledge I pledge allegiance to the Creator, who gives life to all beings, and to the animals, plants, insects, water, and rocks, for which the Creator allowed to exist. One Universe neither above or below, indivisible, with love and compassion for all. View original post.


Thursday, October 18, 2018

RR Board President Responds To Rail-Trail Issues

It is certainly unfortunate that the debate concerning the Adirondack Railroad has continued for as long as it has. One would surely think that adults, objective in their analyses and wishing for the greatest good as an outcome, could have solved this long ago but, no. There is even a renewed attack from the trail advocates. We had hoped that after the resounding success in the courts and the unambiguous decision of State Supreme Court Justice Robert G. Main, that we could begin talks to successfully implement the 1996 Unit Management Plan and not continue the bickering. So let’s take >>More


Thursday, October 18, 2018

Our Town Theatre Group Presenting ‘The Mousetrap’

Our Town Theatre Group has announced they will present Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap, at the Lyle Dye Auditorium stage at Tannery Pond Community Center on October 19, 20 and 21. Performances are set for Friday October 19 and Saturday October 20 at 7:30 pm and Sunday October 21 at 1 pm. Tickets are $12 and $8 for students through 12th grade. Cast includes: Jennifer Bine (Blue Mountain Lake), Shane Diener (Bakers Mills), John Gable (Lake George), Simon Gardner (Minerva), Kim Smith (Wevertown), Maryann Sauro (Chestertown) and Dennis Wilson (Chestertown). Director is Jordan Hornstein. Trish Gardner is once again the Stage >>More


Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The Spier Falls Disaster: An Adirondack Tragedy

Adirondack history is naturally rife with river-related stories—wildly successful fishing trips, damaging floods, wilderness exploration, and dam construction. Rivers were the lifeblood of development:  settlements sprang up along waterways, where partial diversion of streams provided the wheel-turning power necessary to many industries. But freshets were so common and destructive that dams were introduced as flood-control measures, and then for hydropower as the electrification of society unfolded. Recognizing the great financial potential of providing electricity to industries and the masses, power companies sought to develop dozens of potential reservoir sites. Among the arguments they used to justify building dam after dam >>More


Wednesday, October 17, 2018

TAUNY Marking 25 Yrs of Heritage Awards at Folklife Festival

TAUNY, Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, is set to host their TAUNY Folklife Fair: Celebrating 25 Years of North Country Heritage Awards on Sunday, October 28 from noon to 5 pm, with a closing concert by the Fraser Family Friends at 4:15 pm, at The TAUNY Center in Canton. Over 25 years, TAUNY has recognized 129 individuals, groups, places, and events representing the array of traditions that make the North Country special. The Folklife Fair, held this year in place of TAUNY’s annual Salute event, will feature over thirty past award recipients and friends sharing their traditions with the >>More


Monday, October 15, 2018

Gospel Choir Workshop, Concert in Saranac Lake

The Plattsburgh Gospel Choir is set to perform an evening concert, followed by a workshop for all singers, on Saturday, October 27th at the Saranac Lake First United Methodist Church. The workshop with 2 master classes offered by the choir, runs from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm. All singers are invited – and no music reading is needed. This class is free and open to the public, attendees are encouraged to bring a dish for the potluck dinner. The free evening concert will take place from 6:30 to 8 pm, and will feature both the Gospel Choir and workshop participants. >>More


Saturday, October 13, 2018

The Most Negative Sales Pitch Ever

A little more than a century ago, a horrendous description of an Adirondack village appeared in newspapers, including the Mail and Express published in New York City. At issue was the placement of a yet-to-be-built tubercular sanitarium. Feelings ran so high at the time, you’d swear they were selecting the next Supreme Court justice. But taking sides is nothing new, as proved by use of the written word back then to describe one of the candidate locations. As you’ll see, it’s hard to believe they were talking about the same place. One of the favorites was Lake Clear, strongly preferred >>More