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Adirondack Explorer

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Brenden Wiltse: Time to Lead on Wilderness


New York State is one of the birthplaces of the American idea of wilderness. The Adirondack Park stands with Yellowstone and Yosemite as iconic landscapes that helped shape our ideas of the value of wild places. The Adirondacks served as inspiration to many of the early champions of wilderness preservation, from Ralph Waldo Emerson and his compatriots at the famed Philosophers’ Camp to Bob Marshall and Howard Zahniser, who pushed to create a national wilderness-preservation system. Indeed, the Adirondack Park is of global significance. UNESCO recognized the value of these lands and waters when it established the Champlain-Adirondack Biosphere Reserve >>More


Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Adirondack Habitat Awareness Day 2018


The 11th Annual Adirondack Habitat Awareness Day is set to be celebrated at the Adirondack Wildlife Refuge at 977 Springfield Road in Wilmington, on Sunday September 2nd, from 10 am to 6 pm. The Theme this year will be the ongoing challenges Adirondack Wildlife face in a changing climate. The following topics will be discussed at the wolf, coyote and bear enclosures throughout the day: Which non-native animals are increasingly spending seasons in the Adirondacks? Which tick species are increasing, who do they impact, and which animals eat ticks? Should we control the deer & rodent populations, and if so, >>More


Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Adirondack Health Hits $12M Funding Goal


After two years of fundraising, the Adirondack Health Foundation has surpassed the $12 million community goal established for the Future of Care Campaign. The Future of Care Campaign supports Adirondack Health’s $45.8 million capital improvement project, which includes the construction of a new health and medical fitness center on Old Military Road in Lake Placid and a new surgical services wing and MRI suite at Adirondack Medical Center in Saranac Lake. Between donations, grants, bequests and proceeds from special events, the comprehensive total amount raised has grown to more than $16 million. The new Lake Placid Health and Medical » >>More


Monday, August 27, 2018

Tony Goodwin: Peaks Don’t Need Permits


The July/August issue of the Explorer carried an impassioned call from Chris Amato for the Department of Environmental Conservation to implement a permit system for the High Peaks Wilderness Area. Amato’s rationale was that the High Peaks no longer meet the definition of a “wilderness area” contained in the Adirondack State Land Master Plan (ASLMP). The ASLMP definition includes the phrases “untrammeled by man” and “outstanding opportunities for solitude.” Certainly no one, least of all me, will argue that there isn’t significant evidence of human “trammeling” on most routes leading to the 4,000-foot peaks; and on many days “solitude” is >>More


Monday, August 27, 2018

High Peaks Projects Underway, New Regulations Taking Effect


The High Peaks Wilderness Complex and the Vanderwhacker Mountain Wild Forest Unit Management Plan (UMP) Amendments are final and implementation of the management actions described in the two amendments has begun according to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). Currently group size regulations for all of the High Peaks Wilderness, including the former Dix Mountain Wilderness lands, are in effect, limiting day use groups (hikers) to no more than 15 people and overnight use groups (campers) to no more than 8 people.  Parking areas along Route 73 have been striped and parking rules are now being enforced >>More


Monday, August 27, 2018

A Lake George Mystery (Conclusion)


No one knew for certain what had happened to Alma Gatti and Jerry Walker after their disappearance on Lake George in summer 1949. To a certain extent, dragging for the bodies was a crapshoot because no one knew for sure where the presumed accident had occurred. There were no reported sightings of them that day, and no way to determine how far their canoe had drifted before reaching the shore. Within a few days, first one paddle and then another, both stamped as belonging to Lamb’s Boathouse, were found in the vicinity of Watch Point, indicating that searchers were dragging >>More


Sunday, August 26, 2018

Questions Raised Over Adirondack Conservation Easements


While some conservationists are concerned about what they perceive as recently increased logging in the Adirondack Park, New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation has begun providing more information about the nearly 781,000 acres of privately owned timberlands covered by state conservation easements. Those agreements govern many of the larger logging tracts and prevent other commercial development. New York has paid landowners about $95 million for 162 easements since the 1970s, according to the DEC. The agreements call for “sustainable forestry” and generally allow some public use like hiking, hunting and snowmobiling on certain haul roads. Two companies that control almost >>More


Sunday, August 26, 2018

Hobofest: Free Saranac Lake Music Festival Sept 2nd


The 10th Annual Saranac Lake Hobofest has been set for Sunday, September 2nd, 2018. The one-day free music festival takes place from noon until 10 pm, rain or shine under the Big Top. This is the fourth Hobofest at the bandshell at Riverside Park; it’s no longer at Union Depot. This year’s Hobofest celebrates the bands that collaborated to build the event, plus a couple of special guests. Frankenpine, a band made up of former Saranac Lakers and downstate performers, is set to return for a reunion. They were featured the first two years of Hobofest. Two local ensembles that >>More


Sunday, August 26, 2018

Buff Mittens in the Adirondacks


Carol Pearsall of Johnsburg, wife of local historian and author Glenn L. Pearsall, is writing a book on “buff mittens” and is looking for stories and examples. Buff mittens differ from the modern mittens as they were tufted like a shag rug for extra warmth. They required three times the usual amount of yarn that one would use in knitting modern mittens. Often merino wool or a merino cross was used and the art of making these mittens rose and fell with the cycle of wool availability. Warm and durable, they are considered an Adirondack tradition that reached a heyday >>More


Saturday, August 25, 2018

Meet Rosy Maple, Contender for Cutest Moth


The church service was about to begin when some breathless kids pulled me out of my seat to “come see this awesome, pretty, pink-and-yellow, fuzzy baby moth!” on the Sunday school door. It was a rosy maple moth, Dryocampa rubicunda, notable for its dipped-in-sherbet coloring. The moth’s coloring can vary from pink to purple and from yellow to white. “Our” moth had purplish-pink forewings with a creamy-yellow band across the middle. The hindwings were pale yellow with a touch of pink along the edges. Its woolly body was bright yellow above and raspberry pink below. The same pink spilled onto >>More