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Adirondack Explorer

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Adirondack Wild to Hold Annual Meeting in Champlain Valley


Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve will host its Annual Meeting of members and supporters at The Grange in Whallonsburg, Essex County, on Saturday, October 5, with registration beginning at 9:30 AM. The public is invited to attend. There is no charge. The historic Grange Hall is located at the corner of Route 22 and Whallons Bay Road, approximately five miles from the Village of Essex. Participants are asked to bring their own box or bag lunch. Morning refreshments will be provided. The meeting is free of charge, but reservations are requested. To reserve and for driving directions to >>More


Thursday, October 3, 2013

High Peaks History: The 1913 Fire at Chapel Pond


One hundred years ago this September the Keene Valley faced the second massive fire to threaten it from the south since the dawn of the young century.  The irrepressible artist Harold Weston, then a young man of nineteen, was on the front lines along with his family; his father, secretary of Adirondack Trail Improvement Society (ATIS) at the time, was chief adviser to the Army platoon that President Woodrow Wilson had sent to help fight the fires. In his collection Freedom in the Wilds Weston recounts the progress of the fire up the ridge of Noonmark and over the southern >>More


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

The Harvestmen: Daddy Longlegs


Despite the numerous frosts that our region experienced in September, there continue to be many types of bugs that remain active into the autumn in the Adirondacks. Among these hardy invertebrates, and the ones that are quite conspicuous to anyone that spends time working in the yard, garden or on the wood pile, are the harvestmen, known to most as the daddy-longlegs. Like spiders, the harvestmen are classified as arachnids because of their body structure, having 4 sets of legs and a set of arm-like appendages near their mouth. (In the harvestmen, these arms, known as pedipalps, are barely visible, >>More


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

In Inlet Saturday is Adirondack Kids Day


For the second year my family has been asked to join Adirondack Kids Day October 5 from 10 am – 3 pm in Inlet as a fun, interactive way to encourage other families to get outside and be creative. Organized by the Adirondack Kids book series authors, Gary and Justin VanRiper, with the assistance of Kiwanis of the Central Adirondacks, Adirondack Kids Day offers a chance for families to meet local children’s authors, learn new skills and enjoy a day of free activities. According to Town of Inlet Department Head Adele Burnett this year’s Adirondack Kids Day will be bigger >>More


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Exploring Essex Chain Lakes On ‘Day One Of Forever’


As Sue Bibeau and I drove down the long dirt road west of Goodnow Flow, we wondered if many people, if anybody, besides us would be paddling the Essex Chain Lakes. Although it was the first day the chain would be open to the public in more than a century, the state had done little advance publicity. It turns out we were late for the party. When we arrived at the newly created parking area, we were hard-pressed to find a spot. There were nineteen vehicles already there—one from the Florida, the rest from New York State. After signing in >>More


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Forgotten Lake George Photographers: The J.S. Wooley Project


An early 20th century Lake George photographer is about to receive the attention that many local collectors, historians and photographers believe he richly deserves. The photographer is Jesse Sumner Wooley (1867-1943), and the J.S. Wooley Project,  a collaborative effort of photographer Richard Timberlake, Bolton Landing collector and resident Matt Finley and the Brookside Museum in Ballston Spa, has already produced standing-room only slide shows and lectures at the Brookside Museum and Silver Bay, where Wooley was the official photographer from 1908 to 1923.  Another presentation will be presented at the Crandall Library in Glens Falls on October 15. The project >>More


Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Slide Climbing: Santanoni Mountain’s East (Twin) Slide


Santanoni Mountain’s dominantly southeastern aspect Twin (or East) Slide is a fitting twin to the Ermine Brook Slide on the opposite side of the ridge. The nearly mile long track is rife with diverse and beautiful characteristics including open slab, boulders, overhanging bedrock, double-fall lines and cascades. About halfway up, the track splits into several tributaries each with features unique from one another. All good things come with a price; in this case challenging bushwhacks at both the top and bottom. This stunning slide was once, but a tempting jewel that was off limits to the public; access from below >>More


Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Conservation Development in the Park: The Default Option


“Let us develop as if human beings were planning to be around and live on this land for a while longer,” said Randall Arendt, the noted landscape planner and designer and author of numerous books about how to develop the land without ruining its natural, ecologically functional, aesthetic and economic values as open space, books such as Rural By Design. Arendt was one of the keynote speakers at the Adirondack Explorer’s one-day conference last week, Strengthening the APA (NYS Adirondack Park Agency). Stating “there is no constitutional right to sprawl,” Arendt took it right to the APA. “I look forward >>More


Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Adirondack Art: OK Slip Falls Inspiration


I climbed steadily over rocks and boulders, some the size of large pieces of furniture, for half a mile as I worked my way up OK Slip Brook. Sometimes in the thick growth along the shoreline, sometimes rock-hopping right up the brook itself. After a good 30-40 minutes, I came around a bend, crossed several sections of the brook at a gravelly section, and the falls came into sight ahead. OK Slip Falls – around a 250 foot drop – sun coming in from the side, dark rocks, a small drop visible at the top, then the water comes over >>More


Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Local Bat Proposed for Endangered Species Protection


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed Endangered Species Act protection today for the northern long-eared bat, which has been devastated by the disease known as white-nose syndrome. The agency declined protection for the eastern small-footed bat. Colonies of the northern long-eared bat affected by white-nose syndrome have in many cases experienced 100 percent mortality. Protection for the bat is the result of a landmark agreement with the Center for Biological Diversity that requires the agency to make protection decisions for 757 species.  Before today’s decision, Indiana bats were the only bat in the Adirondacks on the Federal Endangered Species >>More