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Adirondack Explorer

May, 2018

Wildlife Conservation Society to end Adirondack program


Zoe Smith

Wildlife Conservation Society has decided to close its Adirondack program after more than two decades.  “I think the best way I can describe it is we are all kind of sad,” said Zoe Smith, WCS’s Director of Programs for the Adirondacks. “What we built for so many years is changing. There is some optimism the work will be continuing.” Smith, Director of Science Michale Glennon, and Office manager Carrianne Pershy will lose their jobs as of Sept. 30, Smith said. Livelihoods and Conservation Coordinator Heidi Kretser will continue working on national and international projects. Established in 1994, the Adirondack program >>More


February, 2018

Inside the Hotel Saranac


Hotel Saranac

The Hotel Saranac in Saranac Lake re-opened in January after being closed for renovations for the past several years. Built in 1927, Hotel Saranac had fallen into disrepair under the previous owners, the Arora family, and out of favor of both locals and visitors. The family bought the hotel from Paul Smith’s College in 2007. Roedel Companies of New Hampshire purchased it for $1.4 million in December 2013. The company spent $35 million on the renovations and a two-story parking garage. “One of the goals was to take it back to 1927 and what it looked like then,” Hotel Saranac >>More


January, 2018

Building the Saranac Lake Ice Palace


Construction of the ice palace for the Saranac Lake Winter Carnival started on Wednesday, as volunteer crews took advantage of the chilly weather. Above are photos from Friday, January 26.


January, 2018

Scenes from a frigid Saranac Lake


frigid Saranac Lake

People living in the Adirondacks woke up to frigid temperatures Friday morning. In Saranac Lake, the temperature hovered around -10 degrees Fahrenheit and gusty winds. The National Weather Service in Burlington reported wind chills at about -30 in the northern Adirondacks and have issued a wind chill advisory until Saturday night. “The dangerously cold wind chills will cause frostbite in as little as 10 minutes to exposed skin,” declared a NWS weather advisory. “Expect wind chills to range from 30 below zero to 45 below zero.” And that was in the lower elevations. Up high in the mountains, temperatures were >>More