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Adirondack Explorer

September, 2017

Wilderness Huts Are Not The Adirondack Way

On July 15, 1932, two giants of conservation met on top of Mount Marcy: Bob Marshall and Paul Schaefer. Marshall was partway through a marathon hike that would take him to the summits of thirteen High Peaks. Schaefer was taking photos to be used in a campaign against a proposal to allow cabins in the Forest Preserve. Schaefer’s account of the chance meeting appears in an appendix to my book Bob Marshall in the Adirondacks, an anthology of Marshall’s Adirondack writings. When informed of the cabin proposal and various assaults on the Forest Preserve, Marshall became agitated and paced back >>More


August, 2012

Authors night at Mountaineer

Adirondack High Peaks Summit Journal

I’m looking forward to gathering with fellow writers for a book signing at the Mountaineer in Keene Valley on Thursday, though I may feel a little out of place among the likes of Russell Banks, Chase Twitchell, Bill McKibben, and Jerry Jenkins. The Mountaineer recently expanded its book department and hopes that Thursday’s book signing will become an annual event. The signing will take place from 5-7 p.m. Green Point Foods will provide light refreshments, and Stan Oliva will provide the music. Check out this story in the Adirondack Daily Enterprise for more details and a complete list of the >>More


January, 2010

Bob Marshall’s booklet online

Bob Marshall was one of the original Adirondack Forty-Sixers, but he thought he was born too late. He would have preferred to have lived in the nineteenth century, before the Adirondacks were overrun by civilization. Well, Bob is now part of the twenty-first century. John Warren, the guy behind the Adirondack Almanack, reports in his blog that a number of old Adirondack books have been digitized and put online. Among them is Marshall’s 1922 booklet The High Peaks of the Adirondacks. It can be read online or downloaded for free. Marshall wrote the booklet after he and his younger brother, >>More


November, 2009

Finishing the 46

You might think climbing the forty-six High Peaks is no big deal. After all, more than 6,200 hikers have done it. But I’ve got news for you: those peaks are as big as they were when Bob and George Marshall and their guide, Herb Clark, climbed them. The Marshall brothers and Clark completed the first round of the forty-six in 1925, inaugurating an Adirondack tradition. What’s more, no matter how many people preceded you, when you climb the High Peaks for the first time, you see the mountains fresh, just as the Marshalls and Clark did. I was reminded of >>More