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Adirondack Explorer

November, 2017

DEC Silent On Possibility Of Rail-Trail Appeal

It’s still unclear if state will fight court decision.


May, 2017

State Hopes To Remove Train Tracks This Year

The state hopes to begin removing the train tracks between Lake Placid and Tupper Lake as early as this summer and begin constructing a recreational trail in the rail corridor in the summer of 2018. The schedule was presented in an informational meeting at the Saranac Lake Free Library on Monday evening. The meeting was hosted by Rich Shapiro, a village trustee, and Ed Randig, a code-enforcement officer for the town of Harrietstown, which includes the village. “We’re not here to debate the rail versus trail. That decision has been made,” Shapiro said at the outset of the public meeting, >>More


March, 2017

Trail Advocates Join Adirondack Rail-Trail Lawsuit

Adirondack Recreational Trail Advocates filed a friend-of-the-court brief this week in the lawsuit over the state’s plan to remove 34 miles of railroad tracks between Lake Placid and Tupper Lake and create a trail for bicycling, hiking, snowmobiling, and other pursuits. ARTA joined the suit on the side of three state agencies being sued: the Department of Environmental Conservation, the Department of Transportation, and the Adirondack Park Agency. The Adirondack Railway Preservation Society, based in Utica, contends the plan to divide the state-owned Adirondack Rail Corridor into an 85-mile rail segment and a 34-mile trail segment is illegal. DEC and >>More


November, 2011

Groups spar over Lake Placid train

Two nonprofit groups are sparring over the future of a rail corridor near Lake Placid, each accusing the other of spreading misinformation. The spat began this week when Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) issued a news release in support of keeping the railroad tracks in place. AARCH noted that the corridor is on the State and National Registers of Historic Places. In response, Adirondack Recreational Trail Advocates wrote a letter to AARCH, asserting that placement on the historic registers is no bar to tearing up the tracks. “We are writing to suggest that whatever legal advice you are getting on this >>More