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Adirondack Explorer

October, 2017

Feeling Nature’s Power On An Adirondack Peak

Check out our video of a hiker in fifty-mph winds on Wright Peak.


October, 2017

Scientist Blasts Bicknell’s Thrush Decision As Political

A scientist at the Center for Biodiversity blasted as “absolutely political” a decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to keep the Bicknell’s thrush off the federal list of endangered species. The Bicknell’s is a rare songbird that breeds in spruce-fir habitat at high elevations in the Adirondacks, New England, and southeastern Canada. The Center for Biodiversity petitioned F&WS in 2010 to designate the thrush as endangered or threatened. In a decision Wednesday, the federal agency rejected that request. It likewise rejected endangered or threatened status for twenty-four other species. Mollie Matteson, a senior scientist at the center, called >>More


October, 2017

An Adirondack Climber Discovers Spanish Limestone

The Adirondack Explorer’s editor enjoys a day on a rock tower overlooking the Mediterranean.


September, 2017

Comparing Two Classic Climbs On Wallface and Cannon

Wallface is the biggest cliff in the Adirondacks and so naturally has attracted the attention of rock climbers from way back. The first recorded routes were put up by two of the country’s best climbers of the 1930s—John Case and Fritz Wiessner. The authors of Yankee Rock and Ice say Wiessner regarded Wallface as the loveliest climbing cliff in the Northeast, because of its “feeling of altitude” and “charm of solitude” (Frtiz’s words). Soon after I started climbing, my friend Mike and I went up Wallface with the help of Don Mellor, who is nearly as famous in these parts >>More