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Adirondack Explorer

August, 2016

Landowners’ warning spoiled day

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I just read in the Ithaca Journal about your lawsuit over public access to navigable creeks and rivers in the Adirondacks. We attempted to canoe the Beaver River from Lake Lila but were surprised to find our access blocked by a severe warning posted by private-land owners in addition to a log over the creek. We were aware from our map that Beaver River traversed private property, but we believed that, as a waterway, the creek should be accessible. Do the landowners have a right to block access to the creek? We had three kids along and were very upset by the menacing nature of the postings. This wasn’t a good introduction to canoeing in >>More


August, 2016

Rail trails can showcase history

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It is never an easy decision to remove railroad tracks, but as far as destroying history I agree with Philip Terrie that a rail trail can actually increase awareness of the industrial past. [“Would rail trail destroy a piece of history?” March/April 2016]. This winter I bicycled the 152-kilometer Otago Central Rail Trail on the South Island of New Zealand. Every few kilometers, well-placed signs tell of local history, often with fascinating photos. A few small train stations are still intact, and at an old gold mine I enjoyed learning how gold was “harvested.” Thousands of people a year travel the trail and read the signs. The people in Central Otago didn’t >>More


July, 2016

‘Frenzy’ perfect word for finches

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The title of your article about finches [“A frenzy of finches,” January/February, 2016] really hit home at our house! We put out a feeder specifically designed for finches this year, and the results have been spectacular at times. The thistle seed has brought them like oiled sunflower never has in the past. I’m attaching a photo that will illustrate. After the birds grab some seed at the feeders, they often land in the cherry tree that is outside our living-room window. Barry Lobdell, Saranac Lake


July, 2016

Letter’s attack uncalled for

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The articles on climate change have been well researched and clearly communicate the latest science for anyone to understand. We are well educated and read broadly and find your information well documented and in the mainstream of climate-change research. We were disheartened, but not surprised, by the letter from Jeffrey Munson of Rangeley, Maine. Having survived three years as residents of Rangeley, we are sorry this self-appointed spokesman has attacked you so bitterly. Rangeley is a beautiful place to visit, but our choice for actually living is the Adirondacks where opinions may differ but vitriolic language is curbed. PS: Pete Nelson’s article, “Park needs diversity,” was absolutely excellent. Thank you. Reverend Wendy and >>More


July, 2016

Hikers do help local businesses

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I have to disagree with Town of Keene Supervisor Bill Ferebee’s claim in his interview with Publisher Tom Woodman [November/December 2015] that “hikers don’t spend a lot in our communities.” The last time I was in Keene Valley (October 2015), I stayed at the Ausable Inn ($45), ate breakfast at the Noonmark Diner ($10), shopped at the Mountaineer ($170), stopped at the Sunday morning farmers’ market in Marcy Field ($20), and paid $22 for the Adirondack Forty-Sixer fund-raising dinner to support the Keene Central School senior class. All in less than twenty-four hours. Many in the hiking community live and work in the Adirondacks as teachers, techies, nurses, business owners who shop locally, >>More


July, 2016

Don’t build Cedar River bridge

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Environmental groups’ objections that maintaining the Polaris Bridge over the Hudson violates the Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers System Act (“Essex Chain questions,” January/February 2016) appear unfounded. Instead, the proposed Cedar River Bridge is the more pressing issue. The primary purpose of the act is to designate high-quality rivers of the state that “shall be preserved in a free-flowing condition and shall be protected for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations.” The law is an important tool to prevent degradation but is not intended to force the removal of infrastructure. Indeed, the maintenance of existing structures (including bridges) is permitted in the act’s Table of Use Guidelines. While the Polaris Bridge >>More


June, 2016

No doubt remains on climate change

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I have to say I’m incredibly disheartened by your inclusion of letters from the two climate-change deniers [March/April 2016]. The time for arguing about whether this is real is long over. The letter writers who said you print “Progressive detritus,” “malarkey,” and “left-wing garbage” and that “anthropogenic global warming is a hypothesis” are just ignorant of the facts supported by 99 percent of the scientific community and anyone who spends any time outdoors or follows the chain of weather disasters around the world, from drought to super storms. At some point we’d better all wake up to the fact that we’re in the same boat and should start paddling in the same >>More


June, 2016

Big win for the High Peaks

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I strongly support the growth of the High Peaks Wilderness in the Adirondack Park. I encourage Governor Andrew Cuomo to accept the proposal made by the Adirondack Council and other environmental groups to expand the Wilderness Area to more than 280,000 acres. As a student studying public lands, I believe that the growth and expansion of the High Peaks Wilderness area will allow New York to become among the leaders of wilderness protection and set an example for the rest of the world. I highly agree with Peter S. Paine Jr. and William H. Kissel’s guest opinion, “A bold vision for High Peaks” [January/February 2016], that a fair compromise would be to >>More


April, 2016

Mt. Adams story stirred memories

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The article about snowshoeing to Mount Adams [“Snowy adventures,” January/February 2016] brought back memories of my tenure with the state Department of Environmental Conservation during the summers of 1959 and 1960. Forest Ranger Ed Shevlin, John Dever, and I worked on the trail to Adams, clearing, brush cutting, and building ladders up and over the outcroppings on the trail. One of our more challenging labors was carrying three triangular roof sections to the base of the tower from the Upper Works Road near the old blast furnace. Each section weighed sixty-five pounds and was carried by lashing a pole horizontally >>More


April, 2016

Man-made climate change unproven

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The Explorer has been one of our favorite publications for a long time. One thing we’ve always appreciated was its sensible approach to controversial issues. With that in mind, I wrote the editor and asked why the Explorer was doing a very one-sided series on the possible impact of anthropogenic global warming hypothesis (AGW). He responded that the Explorer is covering what scientists are researching and what they are concluding. If that is your rationale, then I would expect a series that reports on over 1,300 peer-reviewed studies that question so-called “climate change” (see, for example, http://www.tinyurl.com/y9jrjaf). The editor cited >>More