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July, 2016

Letter’s attack uncalled for

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The articles on climate change have been well researched and clearly communicate the latest science for anyone to understand. We are well educated and read broadly and find your information well documented and in the mainstream of climate-change research. We were disheartened, but not surprised, by the letter from Jeffrey Munson of Rangeley, Maine. Having survived three years as residents of Rangeley, we are sorry this self-appointed spokesman has attacked you so bitterly. Rangeley is a beautiful place to visit, but our choice for actually living is the Adirondacks where opinions may differ but vitriolic language is curbed. PS: Pete Nelson’s article, “Park needs diversity,” was absolutely excellent. Thank you. Reverend Wendy and >>More


July, 2016

Hikers do help local businesses

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I have to disagree with Town of Keene Supervisor Bill Ferebee’s claim in his interview with Publisher Tom Woodman [November/December 2015] that “hikers don’t spend a lot in our communities.” The last time I was in Keene Valley (October 2015), I stayed at the Ausable Inn ($45), ate breakfast at the Noonmark Diner ($10), shopped at the Mountaineer ($170), stopped at the Sunday morning farmers’ market in Marcy Field ($20), and paid $22 for the Adirondack Forty-Sixer fund-raising dinner to support the Keene Central School senior class. All in less than twenty-four hours. Many in the hiking community live and work in the Adirondacks as teachers, techies, nurses, business owners who shop locally, >>More


July, 2016

Don’t build Cedar River bridge

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Environmental groups’ objections that maintaining the Polaris Bridge over the Hudson violates the Wild, Scenic, and Recreational Rivers System Act (“Essex Chain questions,” January/February 2016) appear unfounded. Instead, the proposed Cedar River Bridge is the more pressing issue. The primary purpose of the act is to designate high-quality rivers of the state that “shall be preserved in a free-flowing condition and shall be protected for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations.” The law is an important tool to prevent degradation but is not intended to force the removal of infrastructure. Indeed, the maintenance of existing structures (including bridges) is permitted in the act’s Table of Use Guidelines. While the Polaris Bridge >>More


June, 2016

No doubt remains on climate change

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I have to say I’m incredibly disheartened by your inclusion of letters from the two climate-change deniers [March/April 2016]. The time for arguing about whether this is real is long over. The letter writers who said you print “Progressive detritus,” “malarkey,” and “left-wing garbage” and that “anthropogenic global warming is a hypothesis” are just ignorant of the facts supported by 99 percent of the scientific community and anyone who spends any time outdoors or follows the chain of weather disasters around the world, from drought to super storms. At some point we’d better all wake up to the fact that we’re in the same boat and should start paddling in the same >>More


June, 2016

Big win for the High Peaks

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I strongly support the growth of the High Peaks Wilderness in the Adirondack Park. I encourage Governor Andrew Cuomo to accept the proposal made by the Adirondack Council and other environmental groups to expand the Wilderness Area to more than 280,000 acres. As a student studying public lands, I believe that the growth and expansion of the High Peaks Wilderness area will allow New York to become among the leaders of wilderness protection and set an example for the rest of the world. I highly agree with Peter S. Paine Jr. and William H. Kissel’s guest opinion, “A bold vision for High Peaks” [January/February 2016], that a fair compromise would be to >>More


April, 2016

Mt. Adams story stirred memories

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The article about snowshoeing to Mount Adams [“Snowy adventures,” January/February 2016] brought back memories of my tenure with the state Department of Environmental Conservation during the summers of 1959 and 1960. Forest Ranger Ed Shevlin, John Dever, and I worked on the trail to Adams, clearing, brush cutting, and building ladders up and over the outcroppings on the trail. One of our more challenging labors was carrying three triangular roof sections to the base of the tower from the Upper Works Road near the old blast furnace. Each section weighed sixty-five pounds and was carried by lashing a pole horizontally >>More


April, 2016

Man-made climate change unproven

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The Explorer has been one of our favorite publications for a long time. One thing we’ve always appreciated was its sensible approach to controversial issues. With that in mind, I wrote the editor and asked why the Explorer was doing a very one-sided series on the possible impact of anthropogenic global warming hypothesis (AGW). He responded that the Explorer is covering what scientists are researching and what they are concluding. If that is your rationale, then I would expect a series that reports on over 1,300 peer-reviewed studies that question so-called “climate change” (see, for example, http://www.tinyurl.com/y9jrjaf). The editor cited >>More


April, 2016

Brown in the right in navigation case

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Regarding the navigation-rights case over the Mud Pond Waterway in the Adirondacks, I see that the people suing Explorer Editor Phil Brown for trespass are relying on an argument that the contested waterway is not used for commercial purposes and so shouldn’t be considered open to the public. I would think that if an outfitter took a paying group on a paddle through the disputed area, it would clearly demonstrate viable commercial use. This is my own opinion and does not necessarily represent an official view of The Chesapeake Paddlers Inc. My wife and I lead a group every year >>More


April, 2016

‘Progressive’ commentary offensive

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I am sure my feelings are not the only ones in regard to the articles in the January/February issue concerning diversity and the pope’s views on supposed “climate change.” Having loved the Adirondack Park since my first visit in 1947, catching my first dry-fly brook trout in the West Branch of the Ausable River the same year, and having loved our camp in Wilmington since its purchase in 1988, I do not need one more sentence of what I consider left-wing garbage to elevate my blood pressure. If you want to encourage minorities to visit the Park, fine [Viewpoint: “Park >>More


April, 2016

Topo maps can have information gaps

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Thanks for the brief article about topo-map reading [Outdoor skills, January/February 2016], which is rapidly becoming a lost art in these days of GPS smart phones. A couple of things to add: Indeed, in theory you could encounter a forty-foot cliff that is not on the map. In practice, I encounter much higher cliffs (eighty to a hundred feet) that are not on the map. Night travelers should be especially alert to this. In addition to the contour intervals, map users should be aware that the maps are based on aerial “spot” data, and not all areas are field checked. >>More


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