FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

February, 2018

Limit drone usage

Category:

People go to the woods for all sorts of reasons. Still, I think it’s a reasonable expectation that your reason to visit not unduly impact my or anyone else’s reason to visit. Tossing a drone up in a peaceful place enjoyed by thousands pushes that, in my opinion. Expecting that your aerial photography is OK while the rest of the thousands in attendance do not want drones around is also unreasonable. Anyone see an issue with everyone who visits Cascade’s summit enjoying unfettered aerial photography? I also find the tourist flyovers in real planes a little annoying. Fortunately they seem >>More


February, 2018

Hemlock danger understated

Category:

As a longtime fan of your magazine, I would like to comment on your recent report titled “Hemlock pest found in Park.” The article seemed to minimize the danger from the woolly adelgid, an invasive insect that has been killing hemlock forests elsewhere and was recently discovered near Lake George. My wife and I have a summer place in the Pocono Mountains of Pennsylvania. Our hemlocks are in great distress and are expected to be wiped out. I am having thirty-four beautiful old hemlocks on a one-acre plot sprayed this fall at a cost of over $4,000—a stopgap measure that >>More


January, 2018

Keep talking politics

Category:

Your newspaper/magazine is absolutely the best! The photography is incredible. Every time I read the Adirondack Explorer, I am right there. It’s hard to stop reading. Please keep going on political happenings. Tom Woodman was very relevant when he wrote about the less-than-perfect person, Trump. Politics, unfortunately, has a great deal to do with maintaining our precious wildlife and forests. Anyone remember global warming? A hoax? Adirondack Explorer’s mission is to keep us enlightened. We need all the information we can get. So far, the Explorer has perfectly stuck to its mission. Enlightened social politics is exactly what we need. >>More


January, 2018

Cabin was trashed

Category:

As I understand it, and I have seen firsthand, the Thomas Mountain cabin is coming down because some hikers use it as a trash bin leaving behind bottles, wrappers, trash of all sorts. Medical supplies have also been found (needles etc.). So while we want to blame DEC, in this case we need to blame rude and thoughtless hikers for ruining a good thing for the rest of us. A sad day indeed. Robin Smith, Bolton Landing Editor’s note: This comment is in response to a blog post on DEC’s plan to take down the cabin. The cabin is gone >>More


January, 2018

The power of the woods

Category:

Thank you for publishing “Her First Walk in the Park” in the November/December issue. I work in an inner-city high school and felt that reading Autumn’s experience would be valuable for our students. I gave a copy to one of the teachers. He sent it to his daughter, age twenty-two, who has had difficulty becoming an adult. She immediately took a two-hour walk in the woods and decided to stick with her unsatisfactory current employment. Her thinking during the walk changed the thoughts about her own uncomfortable situation to thoughts of how she could help the stressed family she was with. Autumn’s >>More


August, 2017

Let Mother Nature do her thing

Category:

I read with interest the letter in the March/April issue requesting the Department of Environmental Conservation to place a moratorium on all trapping and hunting of red and gray fox. The intent is to increase the fox populations, which feed on white-footed mice. White-footed mice are a vector species for the bacteria (Lyme disease) transmitted by the deer tick. The author, Mr. Butura, states this is the only way to stem the spread of Lyme disease. This is a rather strong statement when dealing with the biological world. Any factor, man-instituted or not, may cause a wide range of unintended >>More


August, 2017

Hey, that’s my uncle!

Category:

The photo with “Why I Miss Richard Nixon” shows my uncle Russell Train, who went on to become administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency under Presidents Nixon and Ford. Nixon gave him wide authority in the early 1970s to usher in such landmark legislation as the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, Superfund, the Toxic Substances Control Act, and initiatives to protect wetlands and ban dangerous pesticides, among many other progressive environmental protections. My uncle was not a political personality, and he strongly supported the scientific research carried out at EPA. The generally free rein he enjoyed was gradually >>More


July, 2017

Trump bad for the Park

Category:

I write in response to Sandy Trevor’s recent letter titled “Trump Deserves a Chance.” Since taking office, Trump has proposed the gutting of clean-air regulations in order to benefit the coal industry. What true Adirondacker wants a full return to the acid rain that so egregiously attacked our otherwise pristine lakes? He has also scrapped Obama-era rules protecting the water in America’s streams. Does Mr. Trevor not value clean water? Trump has appointed a person to head the EPA who hates the EPA and wants to weaken its power to enforce rules to keep the environment clean. And, of course, >>More


July, 2017

Three ladies and the CATS

Category:

This May we three ADK members and Forty-Sixers decided to explore the newly designed trail system in the Champlain Valley. We contacted CATS (Champlain Area Trails– www.champlainareatrails.com) for advice on spotting cars and how best to approach a duplication of their “Grand Hike” held this year on May 13, which went from Wadhams just north of Westport to the end at Essex on Lake Champlain. Their staff, housed in a very sweet log cabin in the town of Westport, was so helpful with both email contact and in-person advice. None of us was familiar with the area, and we were >>More


July, 2017

That’s ‘Grasse’ to you

Category:

As a subscriber, I wish to point out an error in the May/June issue of Adirondack Explorer. Your paddling article took me by surprise, sitting in my seat as the Clifton town historian here in Cranberry Lake. The river you’ve written about is the Grasse River, not the Grass River. I am a third-generation year-round resident of Clifton, and as an old-timer here, when I say Grasse River I pronounce the e on the end, just as my father and grandfather before me did. It is an old habit that I cannot break. Most of the signs correctly spell the >>More