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Adirondack Explorer

July, 2014

N.Y. looking at immoral hunting change

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I am very alarmed about the Department of Environmental Conservation’s “Black Bear Management Plan for New York State.” Among its proposals are to “Assess the potential benefits and concerns associated with bear hunting practices currently prohibited by the environmental conservation laws (e.g. hunting with the aid of bait or dogs, trapping with cable restraints, taking bears less than one year of age) and consider other options (e.g., spring season) that may increase bear management capacity at some future date.” The DEC says “the controversial use of traps, dogs and bait, all currently outlawed, should be reconsidered to spur interest in >>More


May, 2014

Think twice before allowing mountain bikes

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I want to respond to the viewpoints on whether mountain bikes should be permitted in Wilderness Areas [It’s Debatable, March/April 2014]. I believe mountain bikes are the latest threat to our wild lands, and I am strongly opposed to permitting them in Wilderness Areas. However, I would disagree with Bill Ingersoll, who sees no reason why lands acquired by the state that are “crisscrossed by gravel roads” shouldn’t permit mountain bikes as long as the land isn’t classified Wilderness. Mountain bikes give people a huge mechanical advantage. They shrink wild lands. They can transport more people farther, creating intrusions in >>More


May, 2014

Don’t pull up the rail line

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I would like to take issue with your continuing barrage of support for a rail-trail conversion for the Old Forge-to-Lake Placid corridor [Editorial, March/April 2014]. Repetition does not strengthen your case, and one-sided, myopic thinking does not add clarity. What’s more, your support for a conversion seems to run counter to your stated goals and, to me, seems misguided. To start with, how can Tom Woodman “rail” against the state approving a snowmobile connector trail in the Essex Chain Tract [Editorial, January/February 2014] while endorsing the increased snowmobile traffic through several Wilderness Areas (like Whitney and Round Lake) that would >>More


May, 2014

Limit trail to unused part of rail line

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Regarding the rails-versus-rail-trail debate: What am I missing? Why does it have to be all one or the other? Why not retain the existing tourist-train operations (at the Old Forge and Lake Placid ends) for as long as they remain viable, and develop the multi-use rail trail on the presently unused section of the right-of-way between those ends? That way everyone gets a piece of the pie. The tourist trains seem to be providing a desirable service for those seeking that experience, and the infrastructure seems to be well developed and in good working order where the trains now operate, >>More


May, 2014

Rail trail still the clear choice

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In the your March/April issue, reporter Brian Mann raised questions about the cost and other difficulties of converting the ninety miles of mostly unused rail corridor from Old Forge to Lake Placid into a recreational trail for biking, running, walking, and much improved snowmobiling [“Rail-trail questions”]. Whatever the challenges of converting the obsolete rail line to a world-class recreational trail in the Adirondacks, one thing is clear. It would be much cheaper than restoring rail service on the line. State Senator Betty Little believes the tracks should remain in place even though this would preclude the use of the corridor >>More


March, 2014

Recalling tragedy at Camp Santanoni

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I enjoy my subscription and read with great interest all of the stories. Any article about the Newcomb area and Great Camp Santanoni are most interesting. In 1971 I left my home in Liverpool, NY, to help search for Douglas Legg, a young boy who had gone missing on that private preserve. His grandmother worked with me at Niagara Mohawk in Syracuse. I worked with a large group of volunteers led by a state trooper out of Malone. Search groups went off in all directions, and planes flew overhead looking for “hot spots.” These turned out to be animals or >>More


March, 2014

Make Glens Falls a true gateway

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In the January/February issue of the Adirondack Explorer I was surprised and pleased to see an advertisement urging people to “Warm up in Downtown Glens Falls.” My wife and I have done exactly this since moving north of the city into the Adirondacks forty years ago. Early on, Glens Falls became our “go-to” place for shopping, entertainment, medical services, and a host of other activities. It remains so today because Glens Falls is a true gem. This being said, I’ve always wondered why Glens Falls and its business community in particular don’t take advantage of the city’s proximity to the >>More


March, 2014

Rail-trail idea shortsighted

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It is extremely unfortunate that your paper devotes so much effort to the establishment of a bikeway on the old Lake Placid-Old Forge line. My family and friends have ridden this line in the past and hope to do so again soon. It provides an experience that we have trouble finding elsewhere, that is a train trip in the wilderness. For the past thirty-seven years, my family has camped and rented in the Adirondacks in the summer and fall. We particularly enjoy hiking and canoeing. However, we would never hike on paths that were often used by bicycles, finding their >>More


March, 2014

Polaris Bridge built to last

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In your January-February issue, you had an extensive article titled “A Consensus Solution.” I would like to comment on the Polaris Bridge section. Dave Gibson from Adirondack Wild is reported as saying in regard to the bridge that it was meant to be temporary and should be removed. “Finch, Pruyn constructed this bridge to allow for easy de-construction. It should go, no question about it,” he is quoted as saying. This is not accurate, as Finch never intended to remove the bridge. We purchased the bridge, which had been used in Baltimore, and installed it in the early 1990s to >>More


March, 2014

Don’t restrict extended camping

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I like to camp and trap in remote areas of the Adirondack Park. I need permits for extended stays at a campsite, but I’m allowed only one permit during hunting season. Then I must remove my tent and gear. But trapping season extends for months past the end of hunting season. Then I’m allowed to stay in a campsite for only three days before removing all my gear. This makes it impossible to camp in remote areas. I’m only doing what my ancestors did for one hundred years. Trappers don’t harm the environment in any way with their tents. The >>More