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Adirondack Explorer

May, 2017

More ‘Praise for Quiet Waters’

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I was pleased to see the review by Betsy Kepes in your March/April issue about Lorraine Duvall’s books and wanted to add a comment about what for me makes In Praise of Quiet Waters so engaging. The way Duvall interweaves history, advocacy, and personal story kept each aspect from bogging down the narrative. Her questions about the differences between “wilderness” and “the wild,” and what is necessary to allow a sense of being able to commune with nature, are especially apt. And unlike typical guidebooks, she really conveys the felt experience of canoeing in specific waters. Finally, I appreciated Duvall’s >>More


May, 2017

Leave politics out of it

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According to its masthead, the Adirondack Explorer is “devoted to exploring, protecting and celebrating the Adirondack Park.” A worthy mission which does not include printing Tom Woodman’s rantings because he is upset with the results of the last presidential election. Yes, President Trump has noted that too much power has been assumed by Washington, D.C., and he intends to return that power to the people. I agree with that 100 percent and Mr. Woodman’s characterization of it as “opposition on the federal level” to enlightened environmental policies is irrational. Throwing “enlightened social policies” into the mix, in addition, is way >>More


May, 2017

Saranac Lake marina proposal too big

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We read the “Marina roils the water” article in the Adirondack Explorer (Jan/Feb, 2017) and were surprised by the article’s inattention to the concerns of many members of the Saranac community regarding the proposed size of the marina. While the old marina clearly needs to be rebuilt, expanding the marina’s boat capacity by 110—so that it can house 270 large boats—would completely change the character of Lower Saranac Lake. At present, all kinds of outdoor enthusiasts share the lake harmoniously—paddlers, swimmers, campers, water skiers, fishermen, sailboats, and rowboats. The lake is home to several loons and bald eagles, who return >>More


May, 2017

Investing in a shared future

By Tracy Ormsbee In early April, twelve more businesses in the vicinity of the former Finch, Pruyn lands received a total of $500,000 in Upper Hudson Recreation Hub Microenterprise grants backed by the Nature Conservancy. The money pays for businesses to capitalize on recreational opportunities, such as hiking, rafting, canoeing, and fishing, on the newly protected lands, including the Essex Chain Lakes, Boreas Ponds, stretches of the upper Hudson River, and the two MacIntyre Tracts near Tahawus. The state acquired the Finch, Pruyn lands—sixty-five thousand acres, in all—from the conservancy over the past several years. There is a long history >>More


March, 2017

Gateway proposal is a winner

Even as debate over how the state should classify newly acquired lands continues, creative ideas from state and local officials point to exciting ways for local communities and the Park as a whole to benefit from the expansion of the Forest Preserve. The state’s phased purchase of sixty-five thousand acres of former Finch, Pruyn and Company timberlands over the past five years has held out the promise of sustainable economic development from the start. As spectacular natural attractions like OK Slip Falls, the Essex Chain Lakes, and Boreas Ponds are open to the public for the first time, they should >>More


January, 2017

Guideboats truly inspiring

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Mike Lynch’s article [“Building on tradition,” September/October 2016] was a fine report on an inspired (and inspiring) group of guideboat builders, but I’d like to add some thoughts. Guideboats typically have three caned seats, not one or two, and the boat is rowed from the bow; the middle seat is for solo rowing, or for another passenger (like the stern seat, it was often equipped with a backrest). To call guideboats “heavy and a bit bulky” is rather a slap in the tumble-home. Their beam may be wider than most canoes, but their gorgeous, sculpted lines make canoes and kayaks >>More


January, 2017

Now what?

What to do when as a nation we are preparing to inaugurate as president a divisive figure whose campaign behavior has invigorated the kind of bigotry and intolerance that we should have put to rest long ago? Whose policies are hard to discern amid a torrent of tweets, threats, and campaign-promise reversals?


January, 2017

A different bear experience

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Having just read Mike Lynch’s article “Summer bad news for bears” [November/December 2016] about all the black-bear incidents with “no reported injuries to people,” I am struck by the unhappy coincidence of an episode that happened here in Maryland. The headline in the November 17 issue of the Washington Post reads, “Bear mauls woman in Maryland driveway in ‘rarest of rare’ attack.” It was only a few decades ago that black bears were extirpated here in Maryland and the Maryland Department of Wildlife was selling black-bear stamps to help with their reintroduction in western Maryland. Now it seems that we >>More


January, 2017

Protect Boreas from vehicles

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The Adirondack Explorer has provided a comprehensive survey of the Adirondack Park Agency’s upcoming decision regarding the Boreas Ponds classification. The APA holds the greatest responsibility of protecting the Adirondack Forest Preserve, and classifying the 6.8-mile logging road as Wild Forest, thus allowing motorized-vehicle access, would be an ecological disaster. It is imperative that the APA explore other alternatives, as suggested by many of the Adirondack Park advocacy groups. I encourage allowing people to drive only up to LaBier Flow and then make the short hike to the pond, as opposed to driving all the way up. I’d like to >>More


January, 2017

Boreas roads date to 19th century

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With all the outpouring of ideas on what to do about classifying the Boreas Pond Tract, I thought you might be interested in a brief history of the roads into the Boreas Ponds clearing. The first road was a tote road built in the 1890s that went along the west side of the Boreas River from the Blue Ridge Road into the clearing. It was about six miles long. Finch, Pruyn used this road as access to the Brace Brook Dam on the Boreas River up until 1949. The second road was built in 1935. It went from the end >>More




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