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Adirondack Explorer

November, 2019

Biodegradable waste leaves a trace

biodegradable waste

There are common misconceptions about biodegradable waste that contribute to what we as hikers feel comfortable leaving on the trail.


September, 2019

What New York’s bold climate law means for the Adirondacks

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The CLCPA calls for 100 percent “clean” (read: including nuclear) electricity by 2040, 70 percent “renewable” (read: not including nuclear) electricity by 2030, and an 85 percent across-the-state reduction in all greenhouse gas emissions below 1990 levels – including not just electricity generation but also transportation, buildings and other sectors.


June, 2019

Crowding crisis or hyperbole? With enough help and shuttles, we can manage

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The unprecedented influx of vehicles on sunny summer weekends cannot possibly be denied. Yet pick a day with a little drizzle and the hordes disappear. So are we actually facing a summer with usage spikes that we will not be able to manage?


January, 2019

A stupid species

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Consider the mighty moose, kind of an odd-looking creature. It’s said that after all the other animals were created, God made the moose out of leftover parts. To get a sense of the moose population in Adirondack history, one could start by simply looking at a map.


June, 2018

Hamlets to huts: an idea worth exploring

In the near future, if hikers on the Northville-Placid Trail choose, they can stop in the Town of Long Lake via a new spur trail that comes out at the top of Mount Sabattis, offering a rare mountaintop view on the NPT journey that looks out over the town and lake. They can pick up mailed-ahead supplies from the post office directly below, grab a bite to eat in town, and even get a room for the night with a hot shower. The partially completed trail (the town has built its part, and the state will complete the last mile >>More


May, 2018

Let nature determine the ski season

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In the March/April issue, I was struck by the juxtaposition of the two articles “Canaries in the Mine” and “Giving Winter a Hand.” In the latter, Mr. Cheney-Seymour’s answer to how global warming is disrupting the Van Hoevenberg ski season: install “snow factory” machines that can make snow in any temperature. These machines, of course, operate with electricity generated mostly by fossil-fueled power plants. Which create more global warming. Which will require Van Hoevenberg to install more snow factories. While the catastrophic climate effects of CO2 and methane emissions are becoming clearer every year, global emissions keep rising. This is >>More


May, 2018

Fewer agencies, not more

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I just read the letter from Robin DeLoria, Newcomb town supervisor, regarding rail-car storage in the Adirondack Park (March/April issue). While I’m sure the recommendation of involving all parties is theoretically the proper way to proceed, unfortunately this course of action will result in inaction. Getting two governmental agencies to agree on a course of action is difficult; getting six or more agencies involved means there will be months or years of debate, and nothing will ultimately happen. Someone needs to make a stand to protect the Park from being a dumping ground and get it done.       >>More


May, 2018

Bring back elk, introduce red deer

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I enjoyed your story on eastern cougars. Regarding reintroducing new species, how about another try at restoring elk to the Adirondacks. Even better, European red deer, which are halfway between elk and white-tailed deer in size. They are majestic and a great game species and adapt easily.          Terry Wespestad, Pequannock, NJ


May, 2018

An inspired winter hike

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Thank you for the piece about your editor’s annual March ski up Mount Marcy (“A skier’s rite of winter”). It provided the inspiration I needed. While I have climbed almost all of the forty-six, I was never keen on bagging Mount Marcy, due primarily to the crowds (kind of defeats the purpose of a true Adirondack experience in my mind). However, I had been thinking of summiting Marcy in the late winter, when I knew I would experience fewer climbers. I also hoped to enjoy the High Peaks blanketed in a lovely crust of snow. So, on St. Patty’s Day, >>More


May, 2018

More women environmental leaders

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For too long there have been too few women in leadership positions in the Adirondack conservation movement, but Olivia Dwyer’s important story in the March/April issue (“Where are the women?”) reveals how this historical imbalance is being rectified. I was surprised, however, to see some notable achievements missing in Dwyer’s account. To name a few omissions: Barbara Glaser not only served on the board of the Adirondack Council for twenty-five years, she was also chairwoman of the council’s board during an earlier stage of the council’s development. Frances Beinecke also chaired that organization in its early days and later went >>More




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