FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Saturday, July 20, 2019

Locals Beat Lily Leaf Beetle

The lily, native around the world in the temperate parts of the northern hemisphere, has been an important cultural icon for millennia. Depending where you stand on the globe, it can represent humility, purity, unbridled sexuality, the Province of Québec, wealth, or a thriving garden, to name but a few possibilities. The flower is mentioned in The New Testament, such as in Matthew 6:26: “Behold the lilies of the field: They toil not, they spin not; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.” The message, as » Continue >>More


Saturday, July 20, 2019

Thirteenth Lake Loon History Paddle Tuesday

Garnet Hill Outdoor Center in North River is set to host a paddle, reception, and presentation on the history and conservation of loons on Tuesday, July 23. Dr. Nina Schoch will give an overview of the Adirondack loon population and threats affecting their health and existence. To put a discussion on loons in perspective, there will be a 4 pm guided paddle on Thirteenth Lake, a short distance from the Garnet Hill Lodge’s Outdoor Center. Following the paddle, there will be a 6 pm reception at the Outdoor Center, which is located on the grounds of the Inn. Dr. Shoch, >>More


Thursday, July 18, 2019

Mosquitoes: Life Under Tension

A good friend was in touch; her son was enduring allergic reactions to mosquitos and, like any good parent, she sought solutions. I told her that the most practical, non-toxic way to deal with the problem was to consider a mosquitos’ lifecycle, and interrupt it where it starts. Mosquitoes begin their lives in eggs laid singly or in rafts, in most cases on the surface of water. We purchase mosquito egg rafts at Saint Michael’s College to run student experiments with the hatching larvae. A female mosquito, potentially using your blood or mine for energy, delicately alights on the water >>More


Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Wild Center Adds River Otters With Kanienkehaka Names

Two male North American river otters made their debut at the Wild Center’s Otter Falls exhibit on June 22. The pair’s Kanienkehaka names – Tawi:ne and Rohsno:re – were revealed on July 6 as part of The Wild Center’s Ways of Knowing celebration. The Wild Center’s Curator Leah Valerio worked with the Akwesasne Boys and Girls Club to name the two new otters. As part of the Club’s end of year party Valerio taught the group about North American river otters, painted otter faces on the kids and led a discussion in which the youth developed suitable names » Continue >>More


Monday, July 15, 2019

Brook Floater Mussels

Freshwater mussels are not exactly charismatic. They don’t flit gracefully about like a Karner blue butterfly, or munch on clover like a cottontail. They aren’t known for their sweet songs like a wood thrush, and they don’t close down traffic on the first rainy night of spring like spotted salamanders. They are fish parasites at one stage of their lives, and they don’t even taste good like their saltwater cousins. But America can boast that it is home to the greatest variety of freshwater mussels in the world, so there’s that. And if you were wondering what the most imperiled >>More


Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Native Lupine, Pollinators and the Karner Blue

Lupine is one of the most spectacular flowers of early summer, painting long stretches of roadside with shades of purple and blue. Thanks to this tall, showy plant, even a stop-and-go drive to Boston’s Logan Airport has its moments of beauty (as I recently had occasion to observe). Full sun and dry, sandy soil are just right for lupine. Although many people don’t know it, the lupine we typically see in the Northeast is “not from around here.” It’s a non-native plant that was imported to eastern gardens from parts of the western U.S. and escaped cultivation. Our native lupine >>More


Wednesday, July 10, 2019

The Short, Productive Life of the Luna Moth

On early summer nights I sometimes see large, pale green moths with long, twisted tails fluttering near our porch light. Later, I often find them dead on the ground. These beautiful moths are luna moths, named for the Roman goddess of the moon. Each of their four wings has a transparent, moon-shaped eyespot. The luna moth (Actias luna) is one of the largest species of moths in North America, with a wingspan of three to four inches. It inhabits deciduous forests, where its green wings blend in among the leaves. The moths I’ve seen near my porch light were likely >>More


Tuesday, July 9, 2019

Oak Wilt And Invasive Species Vigilance

It’s hard to be cheerful in a job where I am expected to keep up on each newly arrived or imminent threat from invasive insects, novel plant diseases, and worrisome trends in the environment. Although I typically deflate everyone’s happy-bubble when I give a talk, I’ve discovered we need not fret that the sky is going to fall. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) is a joint effort of research institutions, government agencies and nonprofit groups; their mission is to monitor stuff which falls to Earth that is not some form of water. Since one of the » Continue Reading. >>More


Monday, July 8, 2019

Charges Filed in Massive Illegal Reptile Case

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that Environmental Conservation Police Officers (ECOs) charged an Allegany man with multiple violations in connection with an ongoing investigation into the illegal possession and sale of wildlife, resulting in what they say is the largest seizure of illegal reptiles in New York State history. Several of the animals seized were threatened species or species of special concern. Venomous reptiles, including three king cobras, one of which was over 10 feet long, and six Gila monsters were among the animals allegedly illegally housed at the residence. Because of their potential to >>More


Sunday, July 7, 2019

Fishhook Waterflea Infests Lake Champlain

Anglers returning from the waters of Lake Champlain at Shelburne Bay have reported large quantities of invasive fishhook waterflea fouling their gear. Boat launch stewards with the Lake Champlain Basin Program (LCBP) noted this week that nearly all fishing boats returning to the Shelburne Bay and Converse Bay launches had downriggers infested with the tiny organisms. LCBP stewards removed, treated, and disposed of the fishhook waterfleas. The alarming news for anglers and lake ecology comes during the busy holiday period of Canada Day on July 1 and the July 4th holiday in the U.S. Like the » Continue Reading. View >>More




Subscribe

Learn what’s happening this week in the Adirondacks.

    Select the newsletters you would like to receive.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Subscribe to get access to regular information about food and farming in the Adirondacks while supporting our nonprofit newsroom.