FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Monday, September 2, 2019

10th Annual Great Adirondack Moose Festival

The 2019 Great Adirondack Moose Festival in Indian Lake, is set for the weekend of September 28 and 29, 2019. Visitors to the Indian Lake region for the Moose Festival can expect programs, games, contests, exhibitions, guided tours, shopping – all in the theme of the moose. The Great Adirondack Moose Festival (GAMF) is designed to offer visitors of all ages a purely Adirondack experience as a two-day destination event. This year’s GAMF will feature Adirondack style and moose themed activities such as our very popular moose calling contest; guided wilderness hikes; Moose River Plains self-guided driving wilderness tour; fly >>More


Friday, August 30, 2019

Cover Crops Workshop Planned For Queensbury

This summer the Warren County Soil & Water Conservation District installed a demonstration market farm plot at SUNY Adirondack to promote soil conservation practices in the Lake Champlain Watershed. The District was awarded funding through the Lake Champlain Basin Program’s Small Education and Outreach Grant to create the demonstration plot and to host a series of workshops on market farms and soil health. In conjunction with the series, the District is hosting a workshop on cover crops with SUNY Adirondack and the Champlain Watershed Improvement Coalition of New York. The workshop will focus on cover crop practices for increased soil >>More


Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Give Guiltless Goldenrod A Break

While most plants respond to the shorter days of late summer by starting to wind down their business for the season, goldenrod is a “short-day” plant, the kind that is stimulated to bloom by dwindling daylight. It’s a perennial in the aster family, and is widespread across North America. Continent-wide, we have something on the order of 130 species of goldenrod in the genus Solidago. As one of the most abundant blooms of late summer and autumn, this native wildflower is for many pollinators, including numerous bee species, a vital source of nectar as well as of » Continue Reading. >>More


Sunday, August 25, 2019

Insect Apocalypse: What We Don’t Know May Bite Us

Last February you might have seen news stories about an impending insect apocalypse. “Huge global extinction risk.” “Plummeting insect numbers threaten collapse of nature.” “Insects are dying off at a scary rate.” And those were just the headlines on online articles from New Scientist, The Guardian, and Fortune. Whew. The source was an article in the journal Conservation Biology by Francisco Sanchez-Bayo of the University of Sydney, Australia, and Kris Wyckhuys at the China Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing. Reviewing existing studies, they concluded that 40 percent of insect species are declining, a third are endangered, » Continue Reading. >>More


Saturday, August 17, 2019

The Sceince of Amphibian Regeneration

A few times a year, I bring groups of people into the woods to search for red-backed salamanders in the damp netherworld that is the forest floor. Last spring, it was 8th graders. They did their best to follow the cardinal rule of middle school social interaction – thou shalt not appear “uncool” by expressing interest in anything whatsoever that an adult is asking of you – but the salamanders exposed the chinks in their armor. Crouched low over small wooden boards we’d set out to mimic the rotting logs that red-backeds prefer, the students murmured with excitement. Amidst the >>More


Wednesday, August 14, 2019

North American Invasive Species Conference Set For Saratoga

The 2019 North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) conference has been set for September 30th through October 3rd, in Saratoga Springs. Conference sessions, presentations, and workshops will bridge the geographic divide between West to East and North to South, connecting terrestrial and aquatic invasive species management, research, policy, and outreach initiatives and opportunities across North America. The full conference schedule and agenda details are available online. Registration is open now. NAISMA is a network of professionals such as land managers, water resource managers, state, regional, and federal agency staff, and nonprofit organizations. NAISMA’s » Continue Reading. View original post.


Wednesday, August 14, 2019

Pool Owners, Others Should Report Invasive Beetles

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is encouraging New York pool owners to participate in the Division of Lands and Forests’ annual Asian Longhorned Beetle Swimming Pool Survey during the month of August. This is the time of year when Asian longhorned beetles (ALB) emerge as adults and are most active outside of their host tree. The goal of the survey is to look for and find these exotic, invasive beetles before they can cause serious damage to our forests and street trees. DEC is requesting that people with swimming pools keep an eye out for any » >>More


Sunday, August 11, 2019

Spotties: Sandpipers That Like Lakes

If there’s one place you’d expect to see a sandpiper, it’s on the sand. However, there is one member of this family of shorebirds that prefers streamside to surfside. Almost any time you go for a paddle, you are likely to see small brown birds skimming low across the water with stiff, rapid wingbeats. As they walk along a branch or log, or a muddy stretch of shore, they have a characteristic rear-end bob that never quits. In flight, their calls are an ascending ‘weet-weet-weet.” These little birds are spotted sandpipers, or, as their friends and admirers call them, “spotties.” >>More


Sunday, August 11, 2019

DEC Plans Changes to Deer, Moose Policies

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that they are proposing several regulatory changes in an effort to protect New York’s wild deer and moose from Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). CWD is a fatal and untreatable nervous-system disease affects deer, elk, and moose and is believed to be caused by abnormally shaped proteins called prions. CWD prions are shed through saliva, urine, and feces of infected animals. A healthy deer, elk, or moose can pick up the disease by direct contact with the infected animal’s body fluids or by eating contaminated sources of food or water. DEC >>More


Thursday, August 8, 2019

A Renewed Fight to Protect Migratory Birds

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the use of feathers in women’s hats was all the rage. To meet fashion industry demand for their elegant plumage, several North American bird species (e.g. egrets, herons) were hunted to near-extinction. To safeguard migrating birds from overhunting and unregulated commercial trade in bird feathers, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) was enacted in 1918. The covenant between the United States and Canada is one of the nation’s oldest conservation laws. Since its passage, the MBTA has been expanded to protect more than 1,000 species of migrating birds (e.g. » Continue Reading. >>More