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Adirondack Explorer

Monday, September 24, 2018

As Invasive Waterflea Spreads, Another Confirmed In Champlain

Researchers have confirmed the presence of fishhook waterflea (Cercopagis pengoi) in Lake Champlain, bringing the known number of nonnative and aquatic invasive species in Lake Champlain to 51. The discovery increases the likelihood of the invasive’s spread by recreationists into the Adirondack Park, which currently has 12 known aquatic invasive species in interior lakes and where spiny waterflea has been spreading. The fishhook waterflea is similar to the spiny waterflea, which was confirmed in Lake Champlain in 2014; they are both small crustaceans that are aggressive predators of zooplankton and are known to foul fishing lines. The Finger Lakes and >>More


Sunday, September 23, 2018

Early Success In Grasse River Freshwater Mussel Relocation

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has announced that an innovative project that is relocating freshwater mussels in the Grasse River during an ongoing river remediation project is showing early signs of success and reporting a 98 percent survival rate. As part of an U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-led cleanup project to remove polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from river sediments, a seven-mile stretch of the lower Grasse River in northern New York in being dredged and capped starting next year. Before dredging begins, DEC is collecting mussels from the river bottom and temporarily placing them in areas that won’t >>More


Saturday, September 22, 2018

Whirligig Beetles: Four Eyes On You

“What’s this shiny black beetle with four eyes?” asked Erin Hayes-Pontius, a visiting UVM student, from her microscope. Without glancing up from my own scope I answered, “that’s a whirligig beetle.” Erin’s answer came back: “err, cute … but what’s it really called?” I will grant you that the name whirligig is a bit odd – particularly when applied to an inert pickled beetle – but there are excellent reasons it. In life, whirligig beetles weave and whirl on pond and river surfaces amongst dozens of their peers. They move like miniature motor boats that appear to lack rudder function. >>More


Thursday, September 20, 2018

Indian Lake’s Moose Festival Is This Weekend

According to the Great Adirondack Moose Festival Chairperson Brenda Valentine, it’s difficult for her to believe that it has been nine years since this celebration of everything moose took over the streets of Indian Lake. The festival celebrating New York State’s largest land mammal is back this weekend (Sept. 22-23) with more hikes, vendors, and information regarding the return on the Adirondack moose. “I’ve still never actually seen a moose,” states Valentine. “I know I will someday.” Not everyone is able to see a moose, but Valentine and her volunteer committee want to make sure that people » Continue Reading. >>More


Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Where the Birds Are: Advances In Fall Bird Migration Forecasting

September is the peak of autumn bird migration, and billions of birds are winging their way south in dramatic pulses. A new study published in the journal Science reports that scientists can now reliably predict these waves of bird migration up to seven days in advance. The study details the underlying methods that power migration forecasts, which can be used as a bird conservation tool. In this study, the researchers quantified 23 years of spring bird migration across the United States using 143 weather radars, highly sensitive sensors that scientists can use to monitor bird movements. They filtered out precipitation >>More


Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Fifty Shades of Nightshade: From Delicious to Deadly

Many nightshades are safe and delicious, and go well in sandwiches and sauces. A few are deadly, dished up mainly by criminals, but most occupy a gray area between these two extremes. Worldwide, there are around 2,700 shades of nightshade, a family known to Latin geeks as Solanaceae. The family comprises tasty crops like tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, peppers, and tomatillos. It is also composed in part by jimsonweed and other shady characters which have wrought mayhem and death, both accidental and intentional, throughout history. Nightshades are present on every continent except Antarctica, though Australia and South America have the greatest >>More


Sunday, September 16, 2018

Snakes On The Beach: Our Northern Watersnakes

The northern watersnake, Nerodia sipedon, has a lot going against it in the eyes of most people. I’ve watched this medium- to large-sized snake clear a crowded lakeside beach in a matter of moments. As the local naturalist in my small town, I’ve become this snake’s self-appointed public defender. I’ve stopped children chasing it with large sticks, parents with rocks ready to throw, and once, a policeman who came ready to shoot. “But it is poisonous, right?” he supposed. No, the northern watersnake is not poisonous. It does resemble a poisonous snake: the cottonmouth, Agkistrodon piscivorus, also known as the >>More


Thursday, September 13, 2018

It’s Town of Johnsburg History Weekend

The Town of Johnsburg is connecting its history through storytelling and activities for the third year. The annual Johnsburg History Weekend blends together a grave yard tour, live music, lectures, and children’s activities to make history come alive. “There is so much history in the North Creek area,” says North Creek Railway Preservation Society President Ellen Schaeffer. ”We approached the town three years ago to make the third weekend in September be The Town of Johnsburg History weekend. So much of our history was being forgotten.” Schaeffer explains how 25 years ago a group of concerned citizens saw » Continue >>More


Monday, September 10, 2018

Invasive Species And Their Consequences

It seemed like a good idea. Let’s start a silk industry in the United States. Silk is a valuable cloth in demand all over the world. And insects do the work. All we need to do is import some gypsy moths from France; then just sit back and wait for the money to roll in. So, the moths were imported. They escaped. And today, gypsy moths are a major threat to U.S. forests. Gypsy moths are just one example of an invasive species. There are many more. Asian multicolored lady beetles, for example. You know, » Continue Reading. View original >>More