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Adirondack Explorer

Sunday, April 15, 2018

“Wild Jess” Elliott: Setting the Record Straight

Jessie Elliott was a unique figure in the history of the Beaver River country in the west central Adirondacks. Visitors to the tiny settlement of Beaver River are still told she went to prison for her role in the bootlegging that was rampant in the lumberjack days of the early 1920s. She is listed among the “lawless ladies” in Niki Kourofsky’s recent book, Adirondack Outlaws. Pat Thompson’s memoir about life in Beaver River claims Jessie rode her steed through the settlement with her long hair flowing and a pistol in a holster on her belt. More fantastic stories about Jessie >>More


Saturday, April 14, 2018

Ed Zahniser: Lilac Time in Bakers Mills

A favorite snippet of British poetry my father Howard Zahniser sometimes quoted was “Come down to Kew in lilac time, / It isn’t far from London.” His intense delight in the piece showed in how he would dip one shoulder and lean headlong into his audience — even if only one person — during a recitation. He used his body to punctuate his public speaking about wilderness, too, with his bob-and-weave guided walk-through of rhetorical emphases. “Come down to Kew in lilac time…” There are certain words a lifetime loads with meaning. Lilac was one. Whitman’s “When lilacs » Continue >>More


Thursday, April 12, 2018

Pilot Betty Pettitt Nicholas: Pioneer in the Sky (Part 3)

Betty left the state aeronautics commission when the term of boss and close friend Cap Cornish, director, was ended by a newly elected governor in 1952. But, as Betty Pettitt Nicholas after her 1953 marriage, she remained busy in other aviation-related positions, and took frequent flights in the Cessna 170 that she and husband Ted had purchased. A trip in summer 1955 took them farther away from home than most: they journeyed to Quebec, Canada, and flew over her old haunts in the Adirondacks on the way home. She also took part in flying contests, and earned a bronze-and-glass candy-dish >>More


Thursday, April 12, 2018

‘Imprisoned for the Cause’ Opening at Ti Historical

The Ticonderoga Historical Society is set to open its 2018 season with a free program and exhibit opening on Friday, April 20 at 7 pm at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle. “Imprisoned for the Cause” will look at the arrest, imprisonment and inhumane treatment of women peacefully protesting for women’s suffrage in 1917. In January of 1917, a group of “Silent Sentinels” began standing outside the gates of the White House, hoping to convince President Woodrow Wilson to back the proposed suffrage amendment to the Constitution. Holding picket signs that asked, “Mr. President, what will you do for Woman >>More


Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Buildings on the Forest Preserve: The Historic Classification

The management of historic buildings on the Forest Preserve has been a vexing issue for decades. State management has evolved over the years from a position of building removal to now accommodating historic buildings on the Forest Preserve through the creation of a “Historic” area classification. The state has since built a policy of retaining buildings for public educational and historic preservation purposes. The Historic area classification has been used most notably for Great Camp Santanoni and the two state parks that preserve historic areas – the John Brown Farm in Lake Placid and the Crown Point Historic area. Since >>More


Sunday, April 8, 2018

Bauer: Buildings on the Forest Preserve

The pressure by local governments and historic preservation groups on the state to keep the inner Gooley Club buildings shows some of the challenges the state has had in organizing a coherent management program for buildings on the Forest Preserve. This is not a new issue. It’s been a struggle for decades. Different administrations have dealt with the issue in different ways over the decades; some making ad hoc choices with long-term implications for Forest Preserve law and policy, and others trying to sort out durable long-term solutions. This is the first of three articles that look in depth at >>More


Sunday, April 8, 2018

Paddling Film Festival Coming to Lake Placid Apr 13th

The 13th Annual Paddling Film Festival in Lake Placid has been set for Friday, April 13th. The Paddling Film Festival is an international adventure film tour presenting the world’s best paddling films of the year – whitewater, sea kayaking, canoeing, action and lifestyle – in more than 120 cities and towns across Canada, United States and around the world. The Lake Placid show is organized by Adirondack Lakes and Trails and the Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT), a 740-mile paddling trail from the Adirondacks to Maine. Proceeds from this event benefit the trail. The Paddling Film Festival will » Continue >>More


Saturday, April 7, 2018

TAUNY Handmade Instrument Meet and Greet Apr 14th

A Handmade Instrument Meet and Greet, and Show and Tell has been set for Saturday, April 14th from 11 am to 2 pm at the TAUNY Center in Canton. Instrument makers are invited to show one or more of their handmade instruments along with materials and related items, and to share their stories and demonstrate aspects of their work. The community is invited to view this variety of creations and creative skills, with the chance to meet makers, ask questions, and see their skills in action. At least ten makers are expected » Continue Reading. View original post.


Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Photo Contest: Show Us Your Adirondack Hometown

The Adirondack Explorer‘s next “Views of the Park” photo contest highlights towns, hamlets, and homesteads you love in the park. Post your photos on the theme “My Adirondack Town: photos from the place you call home – seasonally or year-round – in the Adirondacks” to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix. Explorer staff will choose their favorite photos to be included on the Adirondack Explorer website and highlighted in the bimonthly magazine. If yours is chosen, you’ll receive a free one-year subscription to the Explorer. Don’t worry, you don’t need to be a professional. Just get out your phone and snap a pic. Or » >>More


Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Pilot Betty Pettitt: Pioneer in the Sky (Part 2)

In October 1947, pilot Betty Pettitt moved to Indianapolis and joined a staff (for automobile maker Kaiser-Frazer) that included an unusual co-worker: a skywriter who handled the company’s airborne advertising. Skywriting was once expected to prevail as the prime advertising method of the future, only to drop into a steep decline when a new technology, television, provided a reliable method of reaching mass numbers of consumers without having to rely on the whims of weather. But for a few decades, skywriting was a very popular method of advertising and provided excellent employment for skilled pilots. As luck would have it, >>More




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