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Adirondack Explorer

Saturday, December 22, 2018

Poetry: Grace Peak

Grace Peak Down where fingers hold a wind scourged turbulence, lurid and buried in the fractures, your mountain grace blisters like iron smelted, and the mosaic of your eyes light all over. Wrapped in cold teardrops, below the grit of exiled scents, at your peak I feel astronomical, like Asimov’s balloons rising through a diaphanous fog. View original post.


Friday, December 21, 2018

Long Lake Polar Plunge Benefits North Country First Responders

Throughout the year, we depend on first responders. In our community volunteer firefighters fight to save people, homes, and animals, often risking their own lives. The volunteers in various rescue agencies leave the warmth of their own homes to provide medical assistance to those in need. The list goes on. What happens when the first responder needs help? In 2016, Dale Barker founded Believe Northern New York, a 501(c)3, as a way for organizations and people to help those people that help all of us. After a local fire department raised over $17,000 for Barker’s own treatment, he saw the >>More


Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Jefferson County’s Charles Sherman: Huckleberry Charlie (Conclusion)

In summer 1920, as he had done for at least 60 years, Charles Sherman was out on Pine Plains picking huckleberries. His usual tour of North Country fairs was in the works, a highly anticipated journey by Charlie and his admirers alike, but he began feeling poorly and decided not to go. He remained active until early October, but from that point forward was confined to the house as his health deteriorated. It was finally determined that cancer was gradually taking his life. An outline of his unusual history was published in the Ogdensburg Republican-Journal, reviving fond memories of the >>More


Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Call for Artists: Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts

The Adirondack Lakes Center for the Arts (Arts Center) has announced they are seeking artists to exhibit in their three galleries in mid-April through December 2019. Exhibits may last up to six weeks. Artists working in all mediums are encouraged to apply by February 15, 2019. The submission fee is $35 for artists with a valid Arts Center membership or $45 for non-members. Interested artists are encourage to submit up to 10 JPEGs. To submit work, click here. The selection process will be completed by March 15, 2019, with acceptance notifications sent via email. For additional details or questions, contact >>More


Sunday, December 16, 2018

Huckleberry Charlie’s Saga Continues

In June 1917, Charlie Sherman showed up as usual in Watertown to apprise his friends at the Daily Times how things were going. After discussing the blueberry crop, he mentioned his new cat, Snowball, who “could roll over three times without stopping.” A surprise once again was his attire, but not in the customary way: instead of a flashy, multicolored wardrobe, “his suit being of a sober, mixed gray, but to the sport type.” The year played out in typical fashion, with Charlie selling berries during the summer and touring the fairs in the fall. As had become customary, he >>More


Saturday, December 15, 2018

New Book On Lake George Speedboat “El Lagarto”

A new book by Jon Bowers, Legend of Lake George “El Lagarto” and the Men That Made Her Great, is set to be published in the next few weeks, and is now available for pre-order. Bowers says the book “sets record straight” on the story of the famous wooden Lake George speedboat owned by George Reis. Bower’s grandfather, Anderson “Dick” Bowers, was the mechanic who worked with and for Reis over the lifetime of El Lagarto. Bowers grew up listening to the stories of El Lagarto and its world famous distinction as the winner of the top races in the >>More


Saturday, December 15, 2018

Poetry: After the Flowers

After the Flowers Into the hush a mother needs when she strokes the soft temples of her infant son, outside the dewdrops emerge once more. After the flowers are gone, on a blanket of peat moss, feeding the frogs and snakes, they emerge, hurtling toward the starved emptiness of another daybreak. View original post.


Thursday, December 13, 2018

Taylor Haskins Kicks Off Westport Winter Music Series

There are many ways to spend the holidays, or those few frantic weeks just before, that truly ring in the year with quaint Adirondack charm, but I look forward to those events that force me to take a step back, relax and stop worrying about a countdown to Christmas. Award winning trumpeter, composer, and synthesist Taylor Haskins is known for bringing his complex compositions to the Adirondacks as part of the summer Soundwaves concert series. From popular sideman in Grammy-winning jazz big bands to the Green Empire quintet, Haskins keep pushing the boundaries of music. Now an Adirondack resident, Haskins >>More


Wednesday, December 12, 2018

New Book On Adirondack Photographer J.S. Wooley

A new book edited by Richard Timberlake and Philip Terrie, J.S. Wooley: Adirondack Photographer (Syracuse University Press, 2018) tells the story of Jesse Sumner Wooley, a gifted and prolific Adirondack photographer at the turn of the twentieth century. In 1880, Jesse Sumner Wooley, an energetic and entrepreneurial thirteen-year-old farm boy from Saratoga County, took a job as an errand boy for a pair of town photographers. The summer job led to a career that would define Wooley’s life. From that early start, he went on to become a prominent businessman and inventive photographer in Upstate New York. This volume tells >>More


Wednesday, December 12, 2018

K-12 Teachers Offered An Adirondack Experience Through NEH Grant

This July seventy-two teachers from across the country will spend their summer break in a classroom six-million acres wide thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). “Forever Wild,” a week-long immersive experience for K-12 educators, reveals the historical importance of the Adirondack wilderness during the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, including how Americans from bustling cities made use of the natural landscape during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The program, one of NEH’s Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops, relies on SUNY Cortland’s William H. Parks Family Center for Environmental and Outdoor >>More




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