FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Sunday, May 19, 2013

Photo: Northern Lights Across Brant Lake

A large sunspot has been active on the sun lately, and I happened to be up to see the glow of the aurora across Brant Lake in the wee hours of the Saturday morning. The moon was just setting on the horizon about 1 AM and I knew the skies would soon be nice and dark for capturing the gentle glow of the northern lights. This was a 50 sec. exposure with an f /2.8 11 mm wide angle lens on my Nikon D300S using an ISO of 800. The post Photo: Northern Lights Across Brant Lake appeared first on The >>More


Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Adirondack Paddlefest in Old Forge This Weekend

After a week of frost warnings and even snow flurries, the weekend temperatures are due to ease into the sixties and just in time for the Adirondack Paddlefest. In its 15th year, the Adirondack Paddlefest will host paddling presentations, test paddles, on-water canoe and kayak sales, demos, clinics, food and entertainment this Friday – Sunday, May 17-19 in Old Forge. According to Mountainman Outdoor Supply Company Store Manager Will Crimmins, the Adirondack Paddlefest attracts seasoned veterans as well as paddling newcomers to the Old Forge area.  Held at the Old Forge Public Beach, behind the Visitors’ Center, the weekend event >>More


Monday, May 13, 2013

Local History: Warren G. Harding And The Battle of Valcour Island?

It’s remarkable how two unrelated historical events sometimes converge to form a new piece of history. In one such North Country connection, the job choice of a future president became linked to a famous encounter on Lake Champlain. The future president was Warren G. Harding (1921–23), and the lake event was the Battle of Valcour Island (1776). The results weren’t earth shattering, but the connection did spawn coast-to-coast media stories covering part of our region’s (and our nation’s) history. In 1882, Harding (1865–1923) graduated from Ohio Central College. Among the positions he held to pay for schooling was editor of >>More


Sunday, May 5, 2013

Going Solo: Considering An Adirondack Retirement

Earlier this April, my friend retired full-time to an Adirondack lake shaped like a large starfish.  She wrote to say that ice-out was last Friday, and that she was having quite a time adjusting to her retirement. “Retirement?  Having a hard time adjusting?  What could be so hard?” I found myself thinking.  Unplug the alarm clock.  When you wake up, relax and savor the sounds of an Adirondack by-the-lake morning.  Listen to the wind in the pines. Hear the creaking and groaning of the ice, replaced by soft spring waters and an endless sunrise.  What’s not to like? At mid-career, >>More


Saturday, May 4, 2013

Lost Brook Dispatches: The Survey of Lost Brook Tract

Today I bring to a close my long series on surveying.  In doing so I have the pleasure of returning to Lost Brook Tract and its abiding magic. As I described four weeks ago, in 1812 Judge John Richards determined the northern boundary line of Lost Brook Tract as part of his survey of the Old Military Tract, when it and all its surroundings were unexplored wilderness.  Here’s the romantic part for me: history shows definitively that after Richards’ survey no one else mapped or explored any part of the tract for another hundred and thirty-six years.  That’s all the >>More


Friday, May 3, 2013

Northeast National Pastel Exhibition Opening at View

The 9th Annual Northeast National Pastel Exhibition will kick off with an opening reception on Friday May 3, from 5 – 7pm at View in Old Forge, NY. The Northeast National Pastel Exhibition will be on display May 4 – June 29. It’s a highlight of View’s annual exhibition calendar, with thousands of visitors a year from the Northeast and beyond. The exhibition has included works from some of the nation’s foremost pastel artists. As the exhibition grows, so does its reputation. More artists than ever have submitted work in the hopes of being selected this year by Sally Strand, >>More


Thursday, May 2, 2013

Falls On The Hudson River at Lake Luzerne

It’s spring in the Adirondacks! This is a photo of one of the participants in the ‘Perfect Pictures Every Time’ photo workshop I did during the last weekend of April at the Adirondack Folk School in Lake Luzerne. I saw him move into place  by the cascades, and moved over to place him in front of the falls. Zoomed in to a telephoto focal length and shot with about a 1 second exposure to have a nice motion blur in the water. What a beautiful day it was for a workshop and photography.


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Dam History: The Oxbow Reservoir Project

The Raquette River, from Raquette Falls to the State Boat Launch on Tupper Lake, is one of the nicest stretches of flat-water anywhere in the Adirondacks.  Paddling this river corridor under a clear cerulean blue sky, on a sunny autumn day with the riverbanks ablaze in orange and red, is exquisite.  For me, though, the river’s history is as captivating as its natural beauty. Countless people have traveled this section of river over the centuries.  There were native peoples who hunted, fished, and trapped, the hinterlands of Long Lake and further into the Raquette Lake area, long before whites appeared >>More


Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Four Great Art Events in Saranac Lake Friday

It may be due to some weird alignment of the stars, or a movement to start “Cinco de Mayo”  early, but Friday May 3 there are four great art events in Saranac Lake. With good timing, it could be possible for one to make all four events, but it’s more likely choices will have to be made. The 2013 gallery season opens with exhibits at the Adirondack Artists Guild and NorthWind Fine Arts. I will be the featured artist for the month at the Artists Guild, 52 Main Street, and will be showing, for the first time, the paintings I’ve >>More


Monday, April 29, 2013

Washington County Native: Commodore Robert Haggart

Much of the time spent honoring past members of the military is focused on heroes, or those who died in battle. It’s certainly appropriate, but often lost in the shuffle are individuals who survived unscathed after serving with great distinction. An excellent North Country example is Robert Haggart, who made a career out of military service, was known nationally, commanded tens of thousands of men, and was responsible for training vast numbers of naval recruits. Robert Stevenson Haggart was born in April 1891 to Benjamin and Annie (Russell) Haggart of Salem, New York, in Washington County. After finishing school at >>More