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Adirondack Explorer

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

Saranac Hollow’s Civil War Veterans Memorial

 In the tiny town of Saranac, sometimes referred to as Saranac Hollow, stands a monument to the town’s Civil War veterans. What makes it unique is that, during the war, the townspeople sent over three and a half times its draft quota to the Union Army. With a population of 3,600 people, 416 veterans are honored on the monument. Walking around an Adirondack cemetery may seem like something straight out of horror films or reserved for a spooky Halloween night, but standing tall in Independence Cemetery is a war memorial that far exceeds any school lessons covering the United States >>More


Monday, July 22, 2013

New State Lands: Proposed Upper Hudson River Dams

Like many readers of the Adirondack Almanack, I have been closely following the public meetings, discussions, editorials, and position statements concerning the land use proposals for the former Finch-Pruyn lands encompassing the Essex Chain of Lakes and the Upper Hudson River. I do have my favored position, as does everyone who loves and appreciates the Adirondacks.  But my intent here is to talk about the “near losses”. That is to say the geographic area of our concern, over the many years, would have been very different, if a few politicians, and engineers had their way. Of course the real loss >>More


Sunday, July 21, 2013

Artist Sheri Amsel Creates Champlain Valley Map

The artist Sheri Amsel has created a beautiful map of the Champlain Valley with illustrations of the region’s wildlife and habitats. It also shows the region’s many hiking trails. I suppose a hiker could fold it and put it in a backpack, but I’ll bet more people will frame it and put in on their wall. Amsel, a resident of the town of Essex, made the map to draw attention to the natural history and beauty of the valley. “I think the Champlain Valley is an untapped resource,” she said. The 24-by-37-inch map shows roads, hiking trails, lakes, wetlands, peaks, >>More


Saturday, July 20, 2013

David Henderson: The Prince of Adirondac

It was June of 2007 and I was ensconced in the Adirondack Museum library, fortuitously avoiding an unusually muggy early summer afternoon.  I had gone there to do a little research for a work of historical fiction that I thought I might write.  By then my interest in Adirondack history was in full thrall, which made holding the document I had been presented by librarian Jerry Pepper something close to a religious experience. It was an original letter, written in 1826, well preserved though the paper was a bit brittle and slightly darkened with age.  The script was beautiful; fluid >>More


Friday, July 19, 2013

View Fundraiser Features One-of-a-kind Adirondack Chairs

Six regional artists have donated their talents in decorating one-of-a-kind Adirondack chairs to View, the art center in Old Forge, for a Silent Auction.  The six winners will be announced on August 31 during the Preview Cocktail Party at View. Bidding has started. You can register your bid in the Lobby of View or at any event where the chairs will be displayed. If you find a chair you just cannot live without, a $1,000 bid will allow you to immediately take the chair with you. The artists are: Gordon Bashant of Inlet and San Diego, known for his free >>More


Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Short History Of Big Moose Landing And The Carry Trail

Before the automobile, the railroads and the steamers, those who traveled from “the Forge” to Big Moose Lake disembarked on the north shore of Fourth Lake at a location known as “Big Moose Landing”.  Another landing to the west was used that took the traveler past First (called Landon, then Rondaxe) and Second (called Foster, then Dart’s) Lakes to the Third (called Sherman, then Big Moose) Lake, north branch, Moose River.  Guides with their sportsmen would usually head for Elba Island and bear north towards the shore where a landing developed that led to a trail through the woods.  This >>More


Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Guided History Tour Across Lake Champlain Bridge Planned

If you’ve wanted to learn more about what you see as you walk or drive over the new Lake Champlain Bridge, join the managers of the Chimney Point, VT, and Crown Point, NY, State Historic Sites for a guided walk on Sunday, July 28, 2013, at 1:00 p.m.  Tom Hughes and Elsa Gilbertson will leaders a walk across and back on the bridge, and will discuss the 9,000 years of human history at this important location on Lake Champlain. At this narrow passage on Lake Champlain humans have crossed here, as well as traveled north and south on the lake >>More


Monday, July 15, 2013

The Indian River Tract: Lost and Found

New Yorkers have recently come into ownership of nine more miles of the Upper Hudson River and adjoining lakes and tributaries to the west amounting to about 20,000 acres. In addition to the incredible ecological variety and richness, the public has also gained new, strategic points from which canoeists and rafters can exit the river before the truly big rapids begin at Cedar Ledges below the confluence with the Indian River. In early July I went to see one of those exit points and the new canoe carry at the former outer Gooley Club north of Indian Lake, once leased >>More


Monday, July 15, 2013

Lyon Mountain and Ausable Forks: Company Towns

Remember the hit song, “Sixteen Tons,” recorded by several artists and taken to #1 by Tennessee Ernie Ford many decades ago?  Whether or not you’re a fan of that type of music, most people are familiar with the famous line, “St. Peter don’t you call me ’cause I can’t go, I owe my soul to the Company Store,” meaning, “Hey, I can’t die … I’ve got bills to pay.” The line referred to Company Towns of the coal-mining industry, where the company owned everything: coal, land, and houses. Workers were paid with scrip―coupons redeemable only at the Company Store, where >>More


Sunday, July 14, 2013

Fort Ticonderoga Recreating 1758 Battle of Carillon

Fort Ticonderoga will hold a two-day battle re-enactment highlighting the 1758 Battle of Carillon when the British amassed the largest army in North American history to date, but was stunningly defeated by a French army a quarter of its size. The event takes place Saturday and Sunday, July 20-21, 9:30am to 5 pm. Highlighted programming featured throughout the weekend brings to life the story of the French soldiers that protected their lines of defense against all odds as British and Provincial soldiers attempted to drive the French from the rocky peninsula and fortress of Carillon, later named Ticonderoga. Recreated French >>More