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Adirondack Explorer

Monday, November 18, 2013

Benjamin Haynes, North Country Architect

No matter how long a life lasts, the residue left behind is often fleeting, and within a generation or so, most of us are largely forgotten. But it’s also true that every life has a story, and many of them are worth retelling. I often glean such subject matter from obituaries, or from gravestones as I walk through cemeteries. A tiny snippet of information stirs the need to dig for more, perhaps revealing unusual or remarkable achievements and contributions. A recent example involves Benjamin Wood Haynes, a native of Westford, Vermont, who lived and worked in northern New York in >>More


Thursday, November 14, 2013

Adirondack Foundation: New Name, Same Goal

The community foundation known as Adirondack Community Trust, or ACT, since 1997 now has a new name: Adirondack Foundation. “Over the years, our organization has frequently and too easily been confused with a bank,” said Cali Brooks, Adirondack Foundation’s executive director in a statement issued to the press. “Adirondack Foundation more accurately conveys our charitable purpose. While the name has changed, our mission has not: We will continue to lead and inspire the growth of generosity to benefit the Adirondack region.” Last fall, Adirondack Foundation’s Board of Trustees held a strategic retreat to examine the past, present and future of >>More


Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Fred LeBrun: An Era of Private Sportmen’s Clubs Ends

As I write this, the debate is continuing to rage over how much motorized access should be allowed on former Finch, Pruyn lands sold to the state, but regardless of the decision, the age of private hunting and fishing clubs on those lands is quietly drawing to a close. We’re in the middle of a ten-year slide to oblivion for the iconic Gooley Club, the Polaris Mountain Club, and others, but this is a significant year in that slide. As of a year ago, there were thirty-three clubs leasing land from the Nature Conservancy, which bought the Finch, Pruyn properties >>More


Monday, November 11, 2013

Saying Goodbye, But Savoring the Memories

Autumn Leaves, the 18th Annual Glens Falls Chronicle Book Fair, was held at the Queensbury Hotel on Sunday, November 3. Attendance appeared to be excellent, providing evidence that the regional book scene is thriving despite all the changes in publishing in recent years. At the fair, I was afforded the opportunity to visit with a variety of writers, some of whom plan to cover stories of local history. Included in the exchange of ideas were the hows and whys of research, particularly the use of personal interviews, a subject that was fresh on my mind because of recent events. I >>More


Saturday, November 9, 2013

New Book: When Men and Mountains Meet

Glenn Pearsall’s first book, Echoes in These Mountains: Historic Sites and Stories Disappearing in Johnsburg, an Adirondack Community (Pyramid Publishing, 2008), was well received for including the first documentary evidence that famed Civil War photographer Mathew Brady was indeed born in Johnsburg. Now Pearsall has brought forth When Men and Mountains Meet (Pyramid Publishing, 2008), subtitled “Stories of Hope and Despair in the Adirondack Wilderness after the American Revolution.” “The story of the Adirondacks is more than the history of great camps, guide boats and environmental protectionism. It is, ultimately, the story of a people and their relationship to the >>More


Wednesday, November 6, 2013

Celebrating An Adirondack Veterans Day

Sadly, Veterans Day doesn’t seem to get the press that Halloween does. Yes, I realize it doesn’t come with candy or ring the doorbell dressed up like a ninja. Instead it quietly rolls around each November 11th. Celebrated first as Armistice Day to commemorate the November 11, 1918 truce ending World War I, the name was changed in 1954 after World War II and the Korean War to honor all American veterans of wars.  So besides the individual town celebrations to remember those veterans that made the ultimate sacrifice and gave their lives as well as those that continue to >>More


Monday, November 4, 2013

Paul Smith’s College President John W. Mills Retiring

Paul Smith’s College President John W. Mills announced Monday that he will retire on June 30, 2014, after serving in the office for more than a decade.  Mills was the ninth president of Paul Smith’s and the second longest serving president of the college. “This is the best job I ever had,” Mills, 66, said in a statement to the press issued today.  “I’m making this decision, though, at a time when higher education is facing great change. This is an opportune moment for a new leader to help Paul Smith’s execute that transition.” Mills has been president since 2004. >>More


Monday, November 4, 2013

Indian Lake SnoCade Logo Competition Underway

SnoCade is coming to Indian Lake on February 14-23, 2014 and the organizers are looking for a logo design.   Anyone can enter the contest and the winner will receive a $25 prize.   All entries have an opportunity to be on display during a gallery show at the Town of Indian Lake Library during the event. SnoCade will be a  snowmobiling-oriented event that is part of the Indian Lake Winter Fest. In addition to Winter Fest’s many activities (duck tape sled races, circus, tricky tray).  SnoCade will also have snowmobile rides, radar runs and uphill climb races. There will also be: >>More


Monday, November 4, 2013

Lawrence Gooley on Adirondack E-Books

Several times here in the past, I’ve expressed skepticism about the future of e-books. Not that they won’t be around: of course they will. But the wild-eyed suggestions that they would dominate the publishing industry and soon lead to the demise of printed books were premature. When claims like those are made, it’s important to note the source. Often it was the manufacturers of e-readers and sellers of e-books, hoping to garner a chunk of both markets. Their claims were echoed by consumers, salivating at the prospect of toting hundreds of books around on a small digital device. E-books got >>More


Sunday, November 3, 2013

Dave Gibson: Vote Yes on Prop 4

Perhaps I first heard of the Township 40 disputed land titles during the Adirondack Park Centennial year, 1992. It was probably that fall during a Raquette Lake cruise on the WW Durant with Capt. Dean Pohl. I recalled the issues when canoeing on the lake later that decade. My friend Dan and I paddled Raquette Lake, took the Marion River Carry en route through the Eckford Chain of Lakes. I was back paddling on Raquette Lake through some high winds and waves when our mentor Paul Schaefer died in July, 1996. I felt terribly that I was not with Paul >>More