Monday, August 28, 2017

Adirondack Loons Were Once Hunted

The common loon is referred to by the state Department of Environmental Conservation as the “spirit of the northern waters.” Here in the Adirondacks, you can find images of loons seemingly everywhere, from T-shirts to coffee mugs to throw pillows. The birds are revered as the spirit of the wilderness. But there was a time when they were hunted. Native Americans killed loons with bows and arrows, spears, and later rifles, according to the Centre for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment at McGill University. They hunted yellow-billed and red-throated loons as well as common loons. The loons’ skins were fashioned >>More


Friday, August 25, 2017

Ausable River Porta-John Program Hits Goal

Great news: The Ausable River Porta-John program will continue. They reached their crowd-sourcing goal of $4,000 earlier this month to pay for handicap accessible Porta-Johns required by the state. More than 100 people supported the campaign. Now they’ve added another $1,000 stretch goal to pay for an initial round of E. coli and total coliform testing of 10 back-country sites this summer and fall, according to Brendan Wiltse, science & stewardship director for the Ausable River Association. “Our hope is to get some understanding of whether improper waste disposal is leading to contamination of water sources,” » Continue Reading. View >>More


Thursday, August 24, 2017

Still No Source For Contamination At Million Dollar Beach

As the season draws to a close, Lake George partner groups, including the Fund for Lake George, Lake George Waterkeeper Program and the Lake George Association, along with state and local governments, continue to search for the source of contamination to the lake water at Million Dollar Beach. The Department of Environmental Conservation closed the beach again recently after detecting bacterial contamination. “Unfortunately, Lake George continues to be compromised through contamination from an apparent human source at Million Dollar Beach,” said Chris Navitsky, the Lake George Waterkeeper, in a press release issued by the Fund for Lake George. “While tracing >>More


Thursday, August 10, 2017

Take Adirondack Explorer With You

The Adirondack Explorer has a new app, optimized for phone and tablet screens, that has everything you love about our bimonthly magazine focusing on the issues important to the Adirondacks. And now the stories can include videos, additional photos, audio, and links to other stories to help readers gain a better understanding of what’s going on in the Park. And if you’re planning a hiking or canoeing trip this summer, you’ll want to download the app and a free edition of the Explorer’s Annual Outings Guide. Once it’s » Continue Reading. View original post.


Saturday, July 29, 2017

Choosing a Trail Running Shoe

Thinking of taking up trail running? The most important piece of equipment is, of course, your shoes. Drew Haas, an avid trail runner and manager at the Mountaineer in Keene Valley, went over some options with us for the July/August issue of the Adirondack Explorer — with this caveat: “What works for one doesn’t necessarily work for the next.” In general, trail-running shoes are more durable and more protective than street-running shoes. Trail shoes should have a protective plate in the forefoot so you don’t feel every rock you land on. “They hold up better and offer more protections, stability, >>More


Friday, July 28, 2017

16 Adirondack Hiking Challenges: A Bucket List

Since Bob and George Marshall and their guide, Herb Clark, climbed all forty-six of the High Peaks in the 1920s, more than ten thousand hikers have followed in their footsteps. You can read more about some of the hiking challenges easing pressure on the High Peaks in the latest issue of the Adirondack Explorer.  Subscribe here or download the app. Here is a list of other hiking challenges in the Adirondack Park. Most have websites or Facebook pages that can be found by googling their names. Unless otherwise indicated, finishers qualify for a patch: LOCAL CHALLENGES Cranberry » Continue Reading. >>More


Friday, July 21, 2017

Trailhead Porta-John Initiative Needs Your Help

Where people who are active outdoors in the Adirondack Park go to the bathroom is of concern to all of us. Human waste – and don’t think it doesn’t happen on mountaintops, lakeshores, and any peaceful wooded area — can pollute water bodies and ruin the nature experience for other hikers. One way to solve the problem is better education about poop etiquette. Bury it or carry it out. Better yet, go before you enter the woods. The Ausable River Porta-John project is making that easier. Started 10 years ago, it expanded to the High Peaks last » Continue Reading. >>More


Friday, July 21, 2017

A Look Inside New Adirondack Loon Center

The Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation began in 1998 and was run out of Executive Director Nina Schoch’s residence before moving in with Adirondack Hamlets to Huts in 2016. In April, the organization received its non-profit status and a new location for its center at 15 Broadway in Saranac Lake. The new space will accommodate its growth – triple the number of full-time workers – and plans to expand education offerings. Here’s a look inside:   <img » Continue Reading. View original post.


Monday, July 17, 2017

Photo Contest: Show Us Views From Moderate Mountaintops

The Adirondack Explorer‘s next “Views of the Park” photo contest is focusing on everyone’s favorite type of photo: from the summit of a mountaintop. And in light of the ongoing problem of overcrowding in the high peaks region, we’re asking you to post photos from the mountains you’ve hiked that are “Under 4,000” feet, or outside the forty-six high peaks. Post your photos to Facebook and Instagram using the hashtag #adkexplorerpix. Explorer staff will choose their favorite photos to be included on the Adirondack Explorer website and highlighted in the bimonthly magazine. If yours is chosen, you’ll receive a free >>More


Friday, July 7, 2017

A Call For Citizen Scientists To Remove Asian Clams In Sandy Bay

Last year, 475 Asian clams — a small clam, less than 1.5 inches in size, that can spread rapidly — were removed from Lake George, thanks to a half day of work from about 20 volunteers as part of the Lake George Association’s Asian Clam Citizen Science Day in Sandy Bay. The association hopes for a similar result this year from 10 am to 1 pm Monday July 10 when it holds its second Asian Clam Citizen Science Day as part of New York’s Invasive Species Awareness Week July 9 through 15. Volunteers » Continue Reading. View original post.


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