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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘politics’ Category

November, 2015

Peter Bauer: In Lake George Election, The Lake Won


The election last night in Lake George was a referendum on protecting the lake and the lake won. Last night, the team that was swept into office in 2011 on a platform of real change in town government built around protection of Lake George was handily re-elected. Dennis Dickinson won as Supervisor and Marisa Muratori and Dan Hurley won for the Town Board. Dickinson and Muratori narrowly lost the Republican primary in September, but were elected on the Reform Party line. This is the second time that Muratori has been elected on a third party line. Hurley was elected as >>More


October, 2015

Adirondack Demographics: Don’t Blame the Park


At the conference on Adirondack demographics recently held in Albany (described last week by Pete Nelson), there were some familiar faces and some familiar facts. And there were also some familiar but unsupportable conclusions. The speakers reminded us of two main demographic trends: First, the average age in Adirondack towns is going up. And second, the number of school-aged children in Adirondack school districts is declining. These numbers are not in dispute. They are derived from unimpeachable research conducted by the Center for Applied Demographics at Cornell University (CAD). They suggest a serious challenge to the welfare of our friends >>More


October, 2015

Domestic Violence In The Adirondacks


October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month a month dedicated to educating the public about the widespread problem of domestic violence which is estimated to affect one in four women in America. Each year in New York State, police agencies receive over 400,000 calls to help victims of domestic violence. In 2014, the New York State Police from Troop B (which includes Clinton, Essex, Franklin, Hamilton and St. Lawrence counties) investigated a total of 2,378 domestic incidents. These incidents range from verbal arguments between parties, to assaults, strangulations, damaging of property, threats of harm, and child endangerment. The New York State Office >>More


October, 2015

Demographics: Lies, Damned Lies and the Blue Line


I have always felt that there were three prevailing dispositions towards statistics: professional – by those who know how to use statistics and do so legitimately; political – by those who use (or typically misuse) them for propaganda; and cynics. Cynics have an attitude toward statistics best captured by the aphorism popularized by Mark Twain: “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics.” As a mathematics teacher I find this cynical attitude hard to resist. And why not? In modern society the abuse of statistics has become ubiquitous. The disingenuous and even dangerous intersection of legitimate statistical >>More


September, 2015

Paul Schaefer’s ‘Whole Scheme of Life’


My father Howard Zahniser wrote the following in his monthly Nature Magazine book review column in 1945, the year before he first met Paul Schaefer and first came to the Adirondacks. Nevertheless, Paul would have been one of the “few of those” my father invokes: “Many of us seldom get, or take, the opportunity to sense the magnitude of the whole scheme of Life of which we are only a part. We know only the rush of human events, and we seldom even challenge the presumption of those who call this rush the march of time. Only a few of >>More


September, 2015

Diversity: Hearing the Voices of Young People


Making the Adirondack Park more attractive to youth of all backgrounds and preferences was the focus of the second Towards a More Diverse Adirondacks Symposium on August 15th at SUNY-ESF in Newcomb. We had a robust discussion, and the bulk of our time was given to the voices of high school and college-age students, from inside and outside the Adirondacks. Why should the average Almanack reader care about what gets discussed by young people at a diversity symposium in Newcomb? Because in a world that is growing more diverse, the environmental and economic future of the park depends in part >>More


June, 2015

Women’s Day Event in Au Sable Forks


This Saturday, June 27th, women and men will gather at The Tahawus Center in Au Sable Forks to help raise awareness of the challenges girls and women still face in their personal and professional lives. “Holding up Half the Sky: Being a Woman in the North Country,” will begin  at 12:30 pm with a panel of local women, including an Adirondack author from Elizabethtown, a Lebanese American woman from Jay, a high school student from Upper Jay, and Lorraine Duvall of Keene. Members of the panel will provide historical perspective on their lives, and the challenges and advantages of being >>More


June, 2015

Corporate Welfare Fail: The Case of Start-Up NY


The idea of programs to provide public sector jobs for the unemployed reaches back deep into American history. To alleviate the unemployment accompanying the Panic of 1893, Coxey’s Army – a popular protest campaign – called for the creation of government jobs, and this demand was voiced increasingly during the early twentieth century. In the midst of the Great Depression, New Deal government officials developed programs to provide public employment for millions of Americans who had been thrown out of work. Under the Works Progress Administration, the federal government hired the unemployed to build hospitals, schools, museums, roads, city halls, >>More


April, 2015

Willie Janeway: NYS Budget Adirondack Impacts


Negotiations over the NYS budget for fiscal year 2015-16 were messy and dominated by arguments over ethics reforms and education funding, but the final plan contained much-needed investments in clean water, wilderness, wildlife and communities of the Adirondack Park. Foremost is a three-year, $200-million capital program to repair wastewater treatment and drinking water facilities. Under the program, the state would set aside $50 million this year and $75 million in each of the next two fiscal years to pay for matching grants to communities for up to 60 percent of upgrades for local drinking water and wastewater treatment facilities. This >>More


March, 2015

The Last Campaign of Inez Milholland


Historians warn us against falling into a trap called the retrospective fallacy, that is, assuming that whatever happened – the Confederacy was defeated, we survived the Great Depression without a revolution – was bound to happen. When we succumb to that kind of thinking, we overlook the achievements and sacrifices of those who brought us safely to harbor. Among those is Adirondack legend and women’s rights advocate Inez Milholland. “The only people who have heard about her are those who majored in women’s history in college,” Joan Wages, president and chief executive of the National Women’s History Museum, told the >>More