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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘politics’ Category

November, 2018

2018 Elections: An Adirondack Council Perspective


The polls are now closed, most of the votes have been counted, and there were winners and losers. In Washington, power is once again split between the Republicans and Democrats, while in New York, Democrats will take over control of the Senate, putting the state under one-party rule. As the largest non-partisan organization dedicated to ensuring the ecological integrity and wild character of our Adirondack Park, the Adirondack Council keeps a full-time presence in Albany advocating for policies and resources that will benefit the Park’s waters, wildlife and communities. We are willing to work with any and all elected officials >>More


December, 2017

Katie Wilson: Senate Tax Plan Reaction


Last Saturday I woke up to an overwhelming sense of dread and sadness over the state of our government that I hadn’t felt since about this time last year. In the dark of night the Senate voted to take away health care from 13 million people and increase the national debt by $1 trillion. They voted to further undermine the middle class and wage war on the poor. They also voted to give establishment donors a big Christmas present. We knew this bill was really just a donor reimbursement plan. In fact, Senator Graham told us so, himself. But it’s >>More


December, 2017

Remembering Maurice Hinchey, 1992 Adirondack Park Centennial


On November 22, we lost one of the finest legislators in my lifetime, U.S. Congressman and former chair of the NYS Assembly Environmental Conservation Committee, Maurice Hinchey of Saugerties. He was, no doubt, flawed like any human being. But he had remarkable qualities and political skills that allowed him to reach many of his public goals benefiting the Adirondacks, the Catskills and beyond. My Adirondack career started in 1987. By that time, Assemblyman Hinchey had been a champion for the environment for well over a dozen years. All environmental legislation, including New York’s first-in-the-nation acid rain law of 1984 as >>More


November, 2017

Adirondack Historian Publishes Essay Collection


The historian Philip Terrie has come out with a new book that collects nearly sixty articles that have appeared in the Adirondack Explorer newsmagazine over the past two decades. Seeing the Forest: Reviews, Musings, and Opinions from an Adirondack Historian covers a wide range of subjects: Adirondack art and literature, the history of the Forest Preserve, the scourges of acid rain and climate change, the meaning of wilderness, and the saga of a cougar that trekked from South Dakota to the Northeast. Terrie, who lives in Ithaca and Long Lake, is retired from teaching American studies at Bowling Green State >>More


October, 2017

Pete Nelson: Be Wary of Corporate Power in a Constitutional Convention


On Tuesday, November 7th, New Yorkers have an opportunity to vote on Ballot Proposition 1: whether the State will hold a constitutional convention in 2019. Many of my colleagues in the Adirondack environmental world are urging a “No” vote. Anticipating that such a convention would be heavily influenced by moneyed special interests, they are concerned with possible threats to the legendary “Forever Wild” constitutional amendment that protects the Adirondack and Catskill Forest Preserves. They reason correctly that Forever Wild, being the gold standard in wilderness protection, cannot be improved, only weakened, and they don’t want to » Continue Reading. View >>More


June, 2017

Wanted: Grassroots Independent Candidates for Local Office


A regionally based organizing committee is seeking those interested in campaigning for local office this fall and open to the idea of running on a slate with other like-minded “grassroots independent” candidates using the same independent, non-established-political-party ballot line. The project is an outgrowth of the massive women’s march that took place in Washington, DC, this past January and the concurrent march in Lewis, NY, that drew more than 400 participants. So far, this electoral approach involves concerned citizens from Clinton, Essex, Franklin and Hamilton counties. The slate is open to candidates who can endorse a platform that is pro-democracy, >>More


March, 2017

‘Bluestockings’ Once Battled for Women’s Rights


Women’s history month (March) is a reminder of the struggles they have endured for equality and fair treatment. Unity is important in any movement, but in the North Country, women were often on opposing sides in the battle for equal rights. The region’s rural nature had much to do with that division, as did the population’s roots: mountain folk, farmers, and miners were primarily immigrants (many via Quebec) from European countries that were overwhelmingly Catholic or Protestant. Resistance to change was organized by branding the opposition as silly and simultaneously ungodly. For more than a century in the United States, >>More


February, 2017

Trump In The Adirondacks: Tweets From the Tower


Editor’s note: The Adirondack Explorer newsmagazine ran an editorial about Donald Trump in its January/February issue. After it appeared, the following email appeared in Tad Welch’s inbox. We’re not sure why. All we know is that Tad’s reply was routed through a Russian server. Every day before my Twitter storms I admire photos of me from the opposition party media. Saw the one in the Adirondack Explorer. Sad. Make it bigger next time, okay? Maybe a centerfold. I do great centerfolds. Never heard of the Adirondack Park before Kellyanne told me. “Where is it?” I said. “Up north,” she said. >>More


December, 2016

The Electoral College: How We Got Here


Donald Trump carried nine of the ten North Country counties that lie entirely or partly in the Adirondack Park and won 55.4 percent of the region’s votes. All told, 110,730 people in those ten counties voted for Trump. Their votes were counted, of course, but they did not count. That’s because Hillary Clinton easily won the statewide vote, and in our antiquated system of electing presidents, that means she will be awarded all of the state’s votes in the Electoral College when the state’s electors meet this Monday. Nationwide, the tables were turned. Clinton won the popular vote by a >>More


October, 2016

Sandra Weber: How Long Must Women Wait


One hundred years ago, on October 22, 1916, Inez Milholland Boissevain gave a powerful suffrage speech in Los Angeles. At one point, she directed a question at Woodrow Wilson: “Mr. President, how long must women wait for liberty?” As those words echoed through the hall, Inez collapsed on stage. Today, New York State prepares to celebrate the centennial of women’s suffrage and the nation approaches an historic election – a woman is the presidential nominee of a major political party. The importance of casting a vote on November 8, 2016, seems obvious, and the right to vote taken for granted. >>More