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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Natural History’ Category

May, 2013

Adirondack Coast Cultural Alliance Free Museum Weekend


For the 6th year, the Adirondack Coast Cultural Alliance (ACCA) and the Press Republican have organized free admission to 14 participating museums, cultural centers and historical societies for the first weekend in June. The Champlain Valley Transportation Museum’s Director and Fundraising and Membership Lisa Fountain says, “This weekend our Kids Station will be open on Saturday only. We will have crafts for parents and children to do together. This year we have our Robotics coach Justin Collins here with a robot demonstration. Kids can test the robot and play with it. Justin runs our Robotics Camp in the summer. He >>More


May, 2013

Adirondack Wildlife: The Porcupine Gives Birth


June is the month when many forms of wildlife give birth in the Adirondacks. The last week in May and early June marks the start of a nearly four month long interval of weather favorable for birth and the period of development following birth that young birds, mammals, some reptiles, fish and bugs need before they are mature enough to successfully contend with the life threatening challenges posed by the change in seasons. Among the creatures that bear their young shortly after Memorial Day is the porcupine, a large and cold-hardy rodent known for its unique system of defense. Despite >>More


May, 2013

Big Tupper Resort Amphibian Study: Science After The Fact


While it has not attracted much attention yet, Preserve Associates has hired some biologists to conduct an amphibian study this spring to determine the presence of amphibians on some, but by no means all, of the lands proposed for subdivision and development at the permitted Adirondack Club and Resort (ACR) site in Tupper Lake. According to APA correspondence, this survey is taking place or has recently taken place within 800 feet of all wetlands on seven of the small eastern great camp lots, and along Lake Simond Road Extension and the proposed but not yet developed Bypass Road. This expenditure >>More


May, 2013

APA Schedules Hearings On New State Lands


The Adirondack Park Agency plans to hold eight hearings around the state to explain options for managing 21,200 acres of former Finch, Pruyn lands and up 24,200 acres of adjacent Forest Preserve. The agency also will gather input from the public on the management and use of the lands. The APA board is expected to adopt one of the options—possibly with alterations—at its August or September meeting. The state recently bought the 21,200 acres from the Nature Conservancy, which acquired some 161,000 acres from Finch, Pruyn & Company in 2007. The state intends to buy a total of 65,000 acres >>More


May, 2013

If You Care, Leave It There: Don’t Disturb Young Wildlife


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) is reminding New Yorkers to keep their distance and not to disturb newborn fawns or other young wildlife as many animals are in the peak season for giving birth. It is not unusual to see a young bird crouched in the yard or a young rabbit in the flower garden, both apparently abandoned. Finding a fawn deer lying by itself is also fairly common. Many people assume that young wildlife found alone are helpless and need assistance for their survival, however, in nearly all cases this is a mistake and typically >>More


May, 2013

Be Careful of Roadside Moose


I don’t usually count the first time I saw a moose because I didn’t know what it was. My previous experience with antlered animals was completely defined by Saturday morning cartoons. The strange animal that crossed the highway in front of my car, looked nothing like the moose I knew, with its easily identifiable antlers. That first experience was cut short due to an impatient driver who chose to pull around me into oncoming traffic, narrowly missing the female moose. At that time I was so concerned with the possibility of a three-car pile-up that I didn’t notice the large >>More


May, 2013

Annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration Next Weekend


The 11th annual Great Adirondack Birding Celebration is scheduled for next weekend, 31 May – 2 June 2013, at the Paul Smith’s College Visitor Interpretive Center (VIC) in Paul Smiths, New York. The event features field trips to boreal birding hot spots, informative lectures, and workshops. Field trips include: an all-day Birding Across the Adirondacks trip on Friday, plus a selection of half-day field trips on Saturday and Sunday (Birding by Ear at the VIC, Beginner Birder Workshop at the VIC, Bloomingdale Bog, Intervale Lowlands, Little Clear Pond for loons, Madawaska Flow, Spring Pond Bog, and Whiteface Mountain). The keynote >>More


May, 2013

Bug Season: Some Tips For Avoiding Black Flies


Late May and early June is the peak of black fly season in the Adirondacks, and the intensity and aggressiveness of the swarms of these small, dark-colored biting bugs varies greatly from one location to another and from one year to the next. From all indications, this year seems to be one in which there is a definite abundance of black flies in our forests, much to the delight of numerous species of insect eating birds that migrate north to feast on the seasonal abundance of bugs, but much to the dismay of hikers, campers and canoeists that want a >>More


May, 2013

Outside Story: Fabulous Forest Ferns


We all see our forests for the trees, but the woods are alive with other plants. Among the most common are ferns, which don’t just get by in the deep shade of the forest – they flourish. Now, you might be thinking, don’t all those ferns look alike? They form a lovely verdant backdrop to the forest, but they don’t have the showy flowers and distinctive leaves that make other plants so easy to identify. But ferns are surprisingly easy to tell apart. And once you know the names of a few species, they’ll pop out at you as you >>More


May, 2013

Adirondack Insects: Mayflies


As the water warms in streams, rivers and lakes, there is an explosion of invertebrate activity, when the hoards of aquatic bugs that pass much of the year on the bottom are stimulated by the favorable thermal conditions which allow them to continue with their life cycle. Among the insects preparing to leave the safety of some protective nook, or transition into a stage that no longer perfectly matches the surroundings, are the mayflies, an exceptionally prolific and ecologically significant group of aquatic organisms. Mayflies form a category, or order, of insects known as Ephemeroptera, which literally translates into the >>More