FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Natural History’ Category

January, 2016

El Niño May Offer Surprises For Great Backyard Bird Count


With Niño having warmed Pacific waters to temperatures matching the highest ever recorded, participants in the 2016 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) may be in for a few surprises. The 19th annual Bird Count is taking place worldwide February 12 through 15. Information gathered and reported online at birdcount.org will help scientists track changes in bird distribution, some of which may be traced to El Niño storms and the unusual weather patterns the Adirondacks have been seeing lately. “The most recent big El Niño took place during the winter of 1997-98,” according to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Marshall Iliff, >>More


January, 2016

Searching for the Stars at UpYonda Farm


My kids are always searching the sky for various constellations. We are so fortunate to have a dark evening sky so readily available to us. Though the Adirondacks may have less ambient light, the January 23rd full moon will make observing familiar constellations a bit more difficult. Don’t worry. The staff at UpYonda Farm in Bolton Landing is using their indoor StarLab to bring the night sky to us. According to Naturalist Peter Olesheski the portable planetarium is not a new activity for UpYonda Farm. The StarLab unit was purchased with the Glens Falls Pubic School through a grant and >>More


January, 2016

This Weird Winter And Adirondack Wildlife


“Make me one with everything.” If you had to guess, you’d probably say that was a diner order, or a supplication to the Divine. This winter, I think someone whispered that line in Mother Nature’s ear, because even though it is not yet half over, she has already made us a winter with everything. It’s as if she glanced at her weather playlist and hit the buttons for unseasonable warmth, extreme cold, high winds, rain, sleet, ice, and snow, and then selected the “shuffle” function and walked away. After each meteorological mood swing I have heard people comment how confused >>More


January, 2016

Fin, Fur, and Forest Seminars In Warrensburg


The DEC Region 5 Office in Warrensburg will hold four presentations – on winter preparedness, woodlot management, fishing, and turkey hunting – this winter as part of their Fin, Fur, and Forest Seminar Series. The presentations are free and geared for people of all levels of experience. Participants should dress for the weather as a portion of each seminar may include outside demonstrations. All presentations begin at 7 pm at the DEC Warrensburg Office, 232 Golf Course Road in Warrensburg. January 26, 2016 – Winter Preparedness Forest Ranger Mike Bodnar will provide information on how to properly prepare for winter >>More


January, 2016

Owls In January: The Courtship Begins


I’m an enthusiastic, if laid-back, bird watcher. One of the things I love most about spring and summer is the effortlessness with which I encounter a wide variety of birds. Sitting in my backyard, I’ll catch sight of an indigo bunting in the apple tree or watch a pair of phoebes flying to and from their nest. On an afternoon hike, I might spot a Baltimore oriole or hear the sweet sounds of a wood thrush. Not so in winter, when the cold curtails my outdoor activities and so many birds have departed for warmer climes. The dearth of birds >>More


January, 2016

Owls In January: The Courtship Begins


I’m an enthusiastic, if laid-back, bird watcher. One of the things I love most about spring and summer is the effortlessness with which I encounter a wide variety of birds. Sitting in my backyard, I’ll catch sight of an indigo bunting in the apple tree or watch a pair of phoebes flying to and from their nest. On an afternoon hike, I might spot a Baltimore oriole or hear the sweet sounds of a wood thrush. Not so in winter, when the cold curtails my outdoor activities and so many birds have departed for warmer climes. The dearth of birds >>More


January, 2016

Adirondack Journal of Environmental Studies Published


The Adirondack Research Consortium and Union College have partnered to publish Volume 20 of the Adirondack Journal of Environmental Studies (AJES). The avian-themed edition features Teddy Roosevelt’s summer bird list and Larry Master’s Christmas bird count. Leading scientists have contributed research to the journal including, “Songbird Research from Sphagnum Bog to Alpine Summit” by Amy Sauer and David Evers, and “State of the Birds in Exurbia” by Michale Glennon and Heidi Kretser. In all, this edition features 11 articles, one organizational profile of Northern New York Audubon, and color photos contributed by Larry Master. You can receive a free copy of Volume 20 >>More


January, 2016

Adirondack Journal of Environmental Studies Published


The Adirondack Research Consortium and Union College have partnered to publish Volume 20 of the Adirondack Journal of Environmental Studies (AJES). The avian-themed edition features Teddy Roosevelt’s summer bird list and Larry Master’s Christmas bird count. Leading scientists have contributed research to the journal including, “Songbird Research from Sphagnum Bog to Alpine Summit” by Amy Sauer and David Evers, and “State of the Birds in Exurbia” by Michale Glennon and Heidi Kretser. In all, this edition features 11 articles, one organizational profile of Northern New York Audubon, and color photos contributed by Larry Master. You can receive a free copy of Volume 20 >>More


January, 2016

DEC Collects 16.8 Million Eggs For NYS Fish Hatcheries


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and partner agencies collected 16.8 million eggs for the state’s fish hatcheries, the agency has announced.  Each year, DEC staff collect eggs from wild and captive adult fish to rear at DEC fish hatcheries. After the eggs are taken they are incubated at DEC’s state hatcheries.  After hatching, they are fed and cared for by DEC hatchery staff until they reach target stocking sizes.  Fish from New York hatcheries are stocked in lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers throughout the state, supporting the state’s recreational sport fishery. Chinook and coho salmon eggs >>More


January, 2016

Support Sought For Adirondack Loon Center


The Biodiversity Research Institute’s Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation is raising funds for an Adirondack Loon Center in the Tri-Lakes Area.  Dr. Nina Schoch, Coordinator of BRI’s Adirondack Center for Loon Conservation, believes a physical Loon Center will strengthen and expand her organization’s capacity to conduct its scientific research, education, and outreach. Schoch expects the Adirondack Loon Center will be a year-round educational and economic presence. Plans for the Center include office space for staff; an education and outreach area for visitors, with interactive displays about loon natural history, behavior, and conservation; a conference room for educational and » Continue >>More




Subscribe

Learn what’s happening this week in the Adirondacks.

    Select the newsletters you would like to receive.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Subscribe to get access to regular information about food and farming in the Adirondacks while supporting our nonprofit newsroom.