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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Natural History’ Category

March, 2017

Rare Great Gray Owl Draws Birders to Keene


Manhattan resident Kathy Drake has seen nearly 600 different bird species in her life and regularly travels to observe them. So when she recently found out there was a great gray owl in Keene, she decided to drive up to the Adirondacks to see it. After all, it was a lot closer to home than Minnesota, where she spent four days last year unsuccessfully looking for the bird. “You don’t have any idea how magical this is,” Drake said. “It really is.” Drake said she arrived in Keene with her friends in the early afternoon on Wednesday and planned to >>More


March, 2017

The Unusual Life of Barnabee Bear


Wendy Hall, my wife and co-director of the Adirondack Wildlife Refuge and Rehab Center in Wilmington, rescued Barnaby the bear with a Have-a-Heart trap last September. Skinny and gaunt, starving and mangy, riddled with internal and external parasites, and less than thirty five pounds, Barnaby was in real tough shape. For a black bear more than a year old, these conditions could be potentially fatal, and we weren’t sure he would live. Two months later, Barnaby had not only put on 100 pounds, but somewhere between the two months when he began to hibernate in November, and mid-January, Barnaby turned >>More


March, 2017

Research On Native Adirondack Fish Species Continues


Two years ago a research team from Paul Smith’s College published a paper about the possibility that yellow perch could be native to the Adirondacks, after finding its DNA in sediment from Lower St. Regis Lake that dates back more than 2,000 years ago. Now similar sediment core sampling is being done on Mirror Lake in Lake Placid. In late February Paul Smith’s College students under the tutelage of Paul Smith’s College Professor Curt Stager – who led the original study – teamed up with Ausable River Association Science and Stewardship Director Brendan Wiltse to take sediment samples that will >>More


March, 2017

Thurman Maple Days Kicks-Off This Weekend


Thurman Maple Days will be held on weekends in March, starting the 11th and ending the 26th. Free open houses will be held at sugarhouses across the Town of Thurman. Tours and talks will be held at each sugarhouse, as well as freshly made maple treats. The first day Maple Days will conclude with the annual Maple Sugar Party, held at Thurman Town Hall, serving 4 pm to 9 pm, with a buffet and dessert of traditional maple jackwax, also known as “sugar on snow.” Entertainment will be provided by the Warren County Ramblers. Valley » Continue Reading. The post >>More


March, 2017

Thurman Maple Days Kicks-Off This Weekend


Thurman Maple Days will be held on weekends in March, starting the 11th and ending the 26th. Free open houses will be held at sugarhouses across the Town of Thurman. Tours and talks will be held at each sugarhouse, as well as freshly made maple treats. The first day Maple Days will conclude with the annual Maple Sugar Party, held at Thurman Town Hall, serving 4 pm to 9 pm, with a buffet and dessert of traditional maple jackwax, also known as “sugar on snow.” Entertainment will be provided by the Warren County Ramblers. Valley » Continue Reading. The post >>More


March, 2017

March Maple Madness at The Wild Center


Each weekend in March, The Wild Center in Tupper Lake will be celebrating all things maple. Tour the sugar shack, try the maple quest, taste some maple treats at the cafe, and special programming celebrate the maple sugaring season. On Saturdays, March 18th and 25th from 8:30 am until 10:30 am visitors can have breakfast at the Waterside Cafe at the Wild Center to celebrate the sweet season of maple sugaring. Breakfast will include pancakes, sausage, hot beverages, and local maple syrup, followed by a day of maple-themed programs and activities. Tour our on-site sugar shack to learn about the >>More


March, 2017

The Seedy Habits of Bird Feeders


In seedy neighborhoods across the U.S., ordinary people are shelling out hard-earned cash to feed a habit of near-epidemic proportions. The fact of the matter is, about 40% of American households are addicted to feeding birds. Things are even worse in the U.K., where close to three-quarters of the population are beset with this malady. In severe cases, people provide birds with dried fruit, suet, and mealworms, and even landscape their yard with bird-friendly trees and shrubs. Most garden-variety bird-feeding addicts, however, go to seed. It often starts innocently: a few sunflower kernels strewn in the backyard or a » >>More


February, 2017

Sprucelets: An Original Adirondack Medicine


Cold and flu season once again has sufferers scrambling for any kind of relief from all sorts of medicines. A little over a century ago, right here on Northern New York store shelves, next to cough drops by national companies like Smith Brothers and Luden’s, was a local product made in Malone. Sprucelets were created mainly from a raw material harvested in the Adirondacks: spruce gum. Like hops, blueberries, and maple syrup, the seasonal gathering and sale of spruce gum boosted the incomes of thousands of North Country folks seeking to make a dollar any way they could. Much of >>More


February, 2017

Outside Story: Winter Bird Rehabilitation


An injured barred owl sat in the back seat of a four-door sedan, staring balefully out the window at its rescuer. “I saw him on the side of the road, just sitting there, trying to fly,” the young woman explained to Maria Colby, director of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation and Rescue. “Other cars were stopping and then circling back around to see if I needed help. His eye looks messed up.” Colby nodded, her spectacles perched on her nose and her hands protected by large leather gloves with gauntlets. She opened the car door, wrapping the owl up >>More


February, 2017

Cold Hollow to Canada: Roadways and Wildlife Connectivity Talk


The Lake Champlain Basin Program will host “Why did the Bobcat Cross the Road? Roadways and Wildlife Connectivity” by Bridget Butler, Director, Cold Hollow to Canada, on Thursday, March 2, 2017 at the LCBP office in Grand Isle, VT. Butler will discuss some of the wildlife species that roam the Cold Hollow Mountains as well as citizen projects that can provide data to wildlife biologists. The Cold Hollow Mountains stretch across the northern part of the Champlain watershed, and include the Vermont communities of Fletcher, Waterville, Belvidere, Bakersfield, Enosburgh, Montgomery, and Richford. As part of the Northern Forest, these mountains >>More