FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘Hunting and Fishing Reports’ Category

June, 2019

A North Country Man Exposed Racism, Confronted It, and Helped Bring About Change


In the late 1970s, the New York State Human Rights Commissioner was about to find the Plattsburgh Elks Club guilty of violating state laws against racial discrimination. Rather than acquiesce, the club opted for a drastic, self-punishing move: refusing all public rentals of its facilities rather than allow local blacks to rent them. Surrendering their official “public accommodation function” (under state regulations, renting the building or grounds to anyone) was accomplished by adopting a new rule: “The use of the club’s facilities and accommodations shall be granted only to members of the Elks, to sodalities, auxiliaries, and other organizations associated >>More


November, 2018

Wild Turkeys Facing An Uncertain Future


The wild turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, is one of only two domesticated birds native to North America. The Muscovy duck is the other. Five sub-species make up the entire North American population. The most abundant is the eastern wild turkey, sub-species silvestris, meaning forest, which ranges across the entire eastern half of the United States and parts of eastern Canada. They’re readily identified by their brown-tipped tail feathers, which spread into a fan when the birds are courting or alarmed and by the bold black and white bar pattern displayed on their wing feathers. This is the same turkey variety » >>More


November, 2018

Last Free Fishing Day of 2018 On Sunday


Each year the New York State (NYS) Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) offers four opportunities to test New York’s fishing waters for free. No fishing license is required and it’s a wonderful opportunity to give the sport of fishing a chance. Fishing is a spiritual journey for some and an obsession for others. My husband grew up fishing and shares that love with both our children. My son likes the competition while my daughter likes any opportunity to best her brother. Keep in mind that children always fish for free in New York State until fifteen years of age. This Sunday, >>More


December, 2015

Status of DEC Seasonal Access Roads in the Adirondacks


Typically DEC closes most of the seasonal access roads it maintains in the Adirondacks at the end of the regular big game season. Due to the unusually warm weather this year many roads are remaining open to public motor vehicle use until ground frost or snow accumulations warrant their closure. Seasonal access roads are unpaved and often are in rough and sometimes muddy condition. Only four wheel drive trucks, SUVs and other high axle vehicles are recommended for use on these roads, especially now. Even when closed to public motor vehicle use, most roads remain open to public pedestrian use >>More


June, 2015

A Windshield Survey of Back-Country Bugs


Next time you arrive at your cottage, camp or favorite fishing spot and the car’s grille is bristling with wings and other insect body parts, its windshield greased with bug guts, you should be happy. Those insects develop underwater, and they are an indication that the water quality thereabouts is very good. And that you should bring paper towels and glass cleaner next time. Flying fish excepted, it seems odd to call an airborne creature aquatic. But these insects spend the vast majority of their lives in an aquatic life stage called a naiad, or nymph. They breathe through gills >>More


June, 2015

New Online Boater Safety Course Offered


Boaters and personal watercraft operators can now obtain a boating safety certificate by successfully completing an approved online course. Until now, the only option for the 20,000 people seeking a boating safety certificate in New York each year was to complete an eight-hour classroom-based course. Governor Andrew M. Cuomo signed a law in 2013 requiring anyone born on or after May 1, 1996, to obtain a boating safety certificate before operating a motorboat. The law also authorized the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) to approve Internet-based boater education courses. Two internet-based boating education >>More


May, 2015

Adirondack Boat Inspection Program For 2015


Boat stewards are being deployed at 14 new locations and 11 new decontamination stations will be available across the Adirondacks this summer as part of a collaborative program to prevent the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS) in the Adirondacks. The program is the result of an agreement reached among more than 60 conservation groups, owners associations, and local and state governments in March.  The program is expected to locate inspection stewards and decontamination stations along highway corridors with high boat-trailer traffic and near waterbodies with significant AIS concentrations. The stewards, hired and trained by Paul Smiths College, >>More


May, 2015

Annual Whitetail Deer Hunt Numbers Released


About 238,670 whitetail deer were taken during the 2014-15 hunting seasons, slightly less than the statewide take the previous year, according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation. “Regulated deer reduces the negative impacts of deer on forests, communities and crop producers while also providing over 10 million pounds of high quality local protein annually,” DEC Commissioner Joseph Martens said in a statement to the press announcing the numbers. The estimated 2014-15 deer take included 130,068 antlerless deer (adult females and fawns) and 108,604 adult bucks (1.5 years or older).  Hunters in the Northern Zone took 29,075 deer, including 16,727 >>More


May, 2015

Report: Cougar, Elk, Wolf Return Would Boost Economy


An economic study published by the the Cougar Rewilding Foundation, an organization dedicated to the recovery of cougars to their former range, argues that restoring the Adirondack ecosystem with native wildlife would establish Adirondack Park as an international wildlife recreation destination. The report estimates that restoring native woodland elk, bison, wolves and cougars to the Adirondack Park would add upwards of $583 million annually in wildlife watching and big game hunting tourism and create 3,540 new jobs. The study reports that restoration would create opportunities for wildlife tracking classes and vacations, darting, howling and photography safaris, and big game hunting. >>More


May, 2015

Questions Over DEC’s Trout Stocking Practices


When people think of invasive species in the Adirondack Park, they think of Eurasian watermilfoil, zebra mussels, Asian clams, or any number of other exotic plants and animals that have made the headlines. People don’t usually think of brown trout and rainbow trout, but neither fish, though abundant now, is native to the region. Brown trout are native to Germany and were introduced to New York State in the late 1800s. Rainbow trout, native to the West Coast, were introduced around the same time. In both cases, the goal was to enhance fishing opportunities. Today, the state Department of Environmental Conservation continues to stock, and allow stocking, of tens of thousands of brown and >>More