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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

June, 2013

Fort Ticonderoga Offers A New Guided Waterway Tour


Now you can see Fort Ticonderoga the way two generations of soldiers saw the great lakeside citadel in the 18th century during Fort Ticonderoga’s new sunset tour, The Place Between Great Waters.  The ninety minute tour takes place on scenic Lake Champlain located just below the Fort’s imposing walls.  Costumed historic interpreters will lead the tour in an 18th-century battoe while guests paddle along side in their canoes and kayaks (Fort Ticonderoga canoes will be available for rent the evening of the program). “Our story is in our landscape,” says Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga’s President and CEO. “The unique combination >>More


June, 2013

Lake Placid: Heritage Day Features Antique Appraisals


Do you have hidden treasure in your attic?  Do you have a family heirloom that you are unsure of the value?   The Lake Placid-North Elba Historical Society’s annual Heritage Day will be held on Saturday July 13th at The History Museum, 242 Station Street, in Lake Placid.  As part of that event former Adirondack Museum curator and local expert Ted Comstock will be available from 11:00-1:00 to provide an appraisal of antiques and collectibles and perhaps “fill in the blanks” for those unsure of the age and origin of their objects. Cost for the appraisals will be $5 per item, >>More


June, 2013

A Short History of Local KKK Activities


Last week in this space, I addressed the subject of cross-burnings in the North Country, which became common in the 1920s during a resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan. Throughout the region, meetings were conducted by Klan leaders, and thousands of followers were added to their ranks. For many of us, it’s an uncomfortable part of Adirondack history, but there is another side to the story. Despite widespread intimidation spawned by secret meetings, robed figures, and fiery crosses, New York’s citizenry rose in opposition to the Klan policies of bigotry and exclusion. Speaking out against the KKK carried inherent risks >>More


June, 2013

Dave Gibson: Fighting For A Wild Upper Hudson, 1968-2013


This week’s Adirondack Park Agency public hearings in Minerva and Newcomb about the classification of new Forest Preserve land along the Upper Hudson River, Essex Chain of Lakes, Cedar and Indian Rivers were well attended and informative. At Minerva Central School, there was no applause, no heckling. Folks listened to differing viewpoints respectfully, and several speakers noted a fair amount of common interests. While most speakers favored a Wild Forest classification which would allow motorized access through an area long closed to public use, one former Finch, Pruyn manager noted the damage done to the roads by all-terrain vehicles. There >>More


June, 2013

North Country Cross Burnings Are Nothing New


Last week the Watertown Daily Times reported a story that was disturbing on many levels. Knowing that it wasn’t equally disturbing to everyone (rest assured that bigotry is alive and well even in our lovely North Country) makes it even more unsettling. A snippet from the article said, “A Gouverneur man is worried about the safety of his family after he claims he was threatened by a Hammond man …. Ryann A. Wilson burned a cross and threatened to lynch Nigel A. Spahr, a black man ….” If that is indeed what happened, it’s sickening in my opinion, but Wilson’s >>More


June, 2013

Dam History: The Proposed Tupper Lake Reservoir


I am often dwarfed by the vastness of the landforms which surround me.  The glacial lake basin that forms part of the Raquette River Valley is one such formation.  The old meandering Raquette River from Raquette Falls to Piercefield Falls is a good example.  The river twist and turns, almost comes back upon itself for several miles, as it flows towards its mouth on the St. Lawrence River.  At one point it flows into a lake area and makes a series of rather long graceful turns.   The already slow moving water slows even more, and the current of the river >>More


June, 2013

Great Camp Santanoni Restoration Tour June 28


Great Camp Santanoni in Newcomb was built for Robert and Anna Pruyn of Albany beginning in 1892. The estate eventually included 12,900 acres and nearly four-dozen buildings. Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH) director Steven Engelhart and 2012 intern Charlotte Barrett will lead a tour of the site on Friday, June 28, 2013 that will feature the launch of a new guide to Santanoni, authored by Barrett. The day will include stops at the Gate Lodge, the 200-acre farm, and the Main Camp on Newcomb Lake where well see ongoing restoration and learn about the conservation planning and restoration work. The Santanoni >>More


May, 2013

Where Exactly is the North Country?


When New Yorkers say with pride that they come from the North Country, strength, courage and rugged individualism can be seen written all over their faces. In addition, everyone knows they have the ability to withstand abnormally cold and miserable weather, and to survive natural disasters, such as the Great Ice Storm of 1998. But, exactly where is the North Country? Yes, it is in the northern part of New York State, but north of what? Yonkers? Albany? The Erie Canal? The Adirondacks? The term North Country was first widely popularized for use in New York State by the author, >>More


May, 2013

Adirondack Coast Cultural Alliance Free Museum Weekend


For the 6th year, the Adirondack Coast Cultural Alliance (ACCA) and the Press Republican have organized free admission to 14 participating museums, cultural centers and historical societies for the first weekend in June. The Champlain Valley Transportation Museum’s Director and Fundraising and Membership Lisa Fountain says, “This weekend our Kids Station will be open on Saturday only. We will have crafts for parents and children to do together. This year we have our Robotics coach Justin Collins here with a robot demonstration. Kids can test the robot and play with it. Justin runs our Robotics Camp in the summer. He >>More


May, 2013

Raquette River History: Setting Pole and Piercefield Dams


Over the past several years I have been involved with the Raquette River Blueway Corridor (RRBC), which organizes Raquette River Awareness Week,  a week of events along the river from its source at Blue Mountain Lake to the St. Lawrence River at Akewesasne. The staff at The Wild Center have also been involved, by helping to educate the public about the natural history of river with a week of river-related activities, and a river clean-up from “The Crusher” boat launch on Route 30 between Tupper Lake and Upper Saranac Lake, to Simon(d) Pond. This section of the Raquette includes the >>More