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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

November, 2018

Huckleberry Charlie: Jefferson County’s Charles Sherman (Part 4)


In fall 1911, Sherman’s gardening skills, which had paved the way for decades of successful peddling, were credited with helping Woodville’s (near Lake Ontario) George Kring develop an especially prolific squash crop, including one vine that yielded 35 specimens. In a strong agrarian economy, such achievements were frequently touted in the press, a welcome bonus for a man with Charlie’s affinity for attention. For someone who loved being the life of the party, 1913 proved to be a busy and pleasurable year for Charlie, who had entered his seventies. In early June, he joined the festivities as Carthage hosted the >>More


November, 2018

Frederick Douglass Biographer in Saranac Lake Dec 1st


John Brown Lives! is set to host a conversation with Frederick Douglass biographer David Blight and historian Margaret Washington on Saturday, December 1st, 2018, at BluSeed Studios, 24 Cedar Street, Saranac Lake. An opening reception will begin at 6:30 pm, with conversation begging at 7 pm. There is a suggested donation of $15. For more information about John Brown Lives!, visit their website. View original post.


November, 2018

Fort Ticonderoga Plans For Future With New Museum


Fort Ticonderoga was awarded $249,400 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services as part of a $619,630 project to inventory, catalog and store more than 30,000 items from its collection of objects. This three-year project also includes updating of the online collections database recently launched by Fort Ticonderoga. Additionally, Fort Ticonderoga announced it is beginning the next phase of a $70 million capital campaign to support plans to enhance the visitor experience, which includes the construction of a new museum to house and display the growing collections. The museum is expected to serve as the premier North American military >>More


November, 2018

Jefferson County’s Charles Sherman: Huckleberry Charlie (Part 3)


In January 1910, Charlie’s show-biz repertoire was further expanded with “a bunch of new songs and a new spiel” that he performed three times at the City Opera House when an amateur minstrel show came to town. Although he injured his hand working at the paper mill in Great Bend, Charlie continued to rehearse his songs and a monologue about the Pine Plains area, which proved to be a hit of the show. The Watertown Daily Times said, “One of the features not on the program, but which nevertheless called out perhaps a larger share of applause than any other >>More


November, 2018

Bauer: What Does The New State Senate Mean For The Adirondacks?


On Election Day in November 2018, voters across New York State voted for a new direction for the 63-member New York State Senate. With some races remaining close and needing to be finalized based on a count of absentee and provisional ballots, it appears that Democrats have elected 40 Senators and Republicans just 23. There is no way to overstate just what a sea change this is for New York State politics. There is also no way to overstate the questions that this sea change raise for the Adirondack Park, which is cut up into four State Senate districts, each >>More


November, 2018

The Continuing Saga of Jefferson Co’s Huckleberry Charlie


Charlie Sherman was in great demand and welcome at just about any event he favored, for attracting a crowd was the key to success, and few folks could attract a crowd like Charlie could. He followed an itinerary that lasted for decades, traveling from fair to fair, selling his wares (sometimes vegetables, berries, peanuts, or soda) and working as a huckster, promoting other vendors and exhibits. Roaming the grounds, he delivered spiels, sang, pontificated on everything from politics to local history, talked about his past, and spouted witty sayings, often in poetic fashion. It was a win-win situation, adding to >>More


October, 2018

Cure Porch on Wheels Project Moving Forward


Historic Saranac Lake has been awarded a grant to support the Cure Porch on Wheels project in 2019. The New York Council on the Arts (NYSCA) has approved $16,000 to support programming on Historic Saranac Lake’s oral history booth and mobile exhibit space. This is the latest of a number of grants that have supported the project. In 2018, a NYSCA Museum Program grant supported the construction of the Cure Porch on Wheels. The Cure Porch on Wheels project is modeled on the cure porches of Saranac Lake, where tens » Continue Reading. View original post.


October, 2018

The Legend of Jack-O-Lantern


Perhaps the single-most-recognizable symbol of the Halloween season is the traditional hollowed out pumpkin carved into a smiling or ominous, illuminated-in-the-dark face. But, “Why,” I’ve often been asked, “is it called a jack-o-lantern?” While much of what’s known is ambiguous at best, the first widely-accepted mention I can find dates back to the five classes of fairies in Cornish lore: the Small People, the Brownies, the Spriggans, the Buccas, Bockles, or Knockers, and the Piskies. The Piskies went about confusing wary travelers; getting them hopelessly lost and eventually leading them into bogs and moors with a » Continue Reading. View >>More


October, 2018

Hudson River History: The 1903 Spier Falls Disaster (Conclusion)


In spring 1903, more than a thousand men were at work on the final stages of the Spier Falls hydropower project. A large number of skilled Italian masons and stoneworkers were housed in a shantytown on the Warren County (north) side of the river. Most of the remaining work was on the Saratoga County (south) side, which they accessed by a temporary bridge. But the company feared that the high waters of springtime had made the bridge unsafe. To avert a potential catastrophe, they destroyed it with dynamite. After that, crossing the river was achieved about a half-mile downstream from >>More


October, 2018

High Peaks Happy Hour: Valcour Brewing Company, Plattsburgh


Ulysses S. Grant drank here. Maybe. Originally built in 1838 as an army barracks for enlisted men, known as Old Stone Barracks, the grand building on Ohio Avenue in Plattsburgh is now home to Valcour Brewing Company. Though Grant is reported to have stayed in the officers’ barracks that once stood adjacent in the mid 1800s, it’s possible he may have sat on the porch of the Old Stone Barracks swilling beer and swapping stories with the enlisted men. Even if Grant didn’t drink here, Valcour Brewing Company can openly boast that Kim and Pam Ladd drank here – twice >>More