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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

February, 2019

Adirondack History Museum Seeking 46er Summit Canisters


The Adirondack History Museum is starting a campaign to gather as many Adirondack 46er summit canisters as possible to incorporate in their Hiking the Adirondack High Peaks exhibit. The Museum currently has four canisters, from Seward, Marshall, Santanoni, and Esther. Their goal is to be the repository for the entire collection, to be permanently displayed at the Adirondack History Museum. Canisters once dotted the summits of 22 peaks the 46ers designated as trailless. In the late 1940s, there were so many Band-Aid tins and other handy receptacles left on these peaks with hikers’ names in them, some not on the >>More


February, 2019

Nonpareil Athlete Babe Didrikson’s North Country Visit


During the first half of the 20th century, traveling basketball and baseball teams were part of America’s social fabric, providing great entertainment for millions of appreciative fans. Mostly visiting cities and surrounding communities, the famous and near-famous made the rounds each year. Their competition consisted of locally organized squads that often recruited one or more talented college or semi-pro players. In New York, the most popular routes for traveling teams were from New York City north to Albany, and west to Buffalo. It was uncommon to find nationally known stars straying from those paths to visit the state’s northernmost regions, >>More


January, 2019

Ticonderoga Historical To Conserve Battlefields Mural


The Ticonderoga Historical Society has received a grant of $7,500 for the conservation of a mural depicting the significant historic battlefields from Plattsburgh to Saratoga. The four-foot by eight-foot mural was created by English graphic artist Ernest Clegg. The mural is scheduled to leave the Hancock House, the home of the Ticonderoga Historical Society, early in March for a three-month long period of treatment. Conservation work on the mural will be overseen by Carolyn Frisa of Works on Paper LLC. Funding is being provided by the Greater Hudson Heritage Network in partnership with public funds provided by the New » >>More


January, 2019

Fort William Henry Corp Under New Leadership


The Board of Directors of Fort William Henry Corporation has announced the election of Kathryn Flacke Muncil, Sebastian J. Luciano, and Nancy Flacke Reuss to a new executive leadership team. The first Fort William Henry Hotel opened in 1855. The resort, one of the oldest and largest on Lake George, now includes the Fort William Henry Hotel and Conference Center, the Best Western Hotel at Exit 21 and the recreated Fort William Henry, site of a pivotal 1757 French and Indian War battle. The election follows the death in November of Robert F. Flacke, Chairman of the Board and » >>More


January, 2019

That So-Called Adirondack Hall of Fame


I’ve made it a point of personal honor not to engage in arguments over lists, a lesson learned in high school when the radio stations would play their obligatory end-of-year “100 Greatest Rock and Roll Songs of All Time” segments. And you’d sit around with a bunch of people in your friend’s basement having a meltdown that Stairway to Heaven placed ahead of Satisfaction. The capper was when stations, looking to reintroduce some buzz into a growingly tired feature, would pick something like Rubberband Man by the Spinners as the No. 1 Rock and Roll Song of All Time, spurring >>More


January, 2019

John W. Taylor: New York’s (Almost Only) Speaker of the House


The title Speaker of the House of Representatives has received lots of attention during the past few years. It’s hard to believe that the nation’s fourth-most-populous state (New York—nearly always number one, and in the top five since 1790) has only one native who served in that position. Well, technically, there are two, but one of them served 99.82 percent of the pair’s total time in office—to be explained later. If you’re from Northern New York and dislike the idea of people owning people, you’ll be pleased at his strong stance for freedom during one of our nation’s most turbulent >>More


January, 2019

When The 1918 Influenza Pandemic Reached Keene


Local historian and author Margaret Bartley is set to give a talk on the impact the 1918 Influenza Pandemic had in the Town of Keene at the Keene Valley Library. Bartley has collected individual stories and photos that help convey the impact the public health crisis had on the relatively isolated community. She will detail the devastating flu’s impact on Keene and the surrounding Adirondack region. Bartley estimates 90% of the hamlet’s population was infected. At one point in 1919, there were so many deaths town officials struggled to bury the bodies.   Worldwide, an estimated half a billion people >>More


January, 2019

Murder in Troy: The Welshman And William Wesson (Conclusion)


What follows is the conclusion of the murder story that was begun here last week, ending with testimony from several witnesses, including the defendant. This picks up in the trial’s final phase. During closing statements, defense attorney Jeremiah K. Long pleaded for his client’s life: “The charge of murder in the first degree is a fearful one. To condemn this aged man to death will be a fearful responsibility for every individual juror. The facts did not warrant a conclusion of deliberate killing. The ends of justice might be satisfied by the infliction of a lighter penalty than death…. None >>More


January, 2019

MLK’s Poor People’s Campaign Revival in Saranac Lake


A celebration of the life of Martin Luther King has been set for Saturday, January 19, 2019 from 7 to 8 pm at the First Presbyterian Church Great Hall, 57 Church Street in Saranac Lake. After listening to Dr. King’s words on the need for social and economic justice, Joe Paparone will speak on the revival of Dr. King’s last project, the Poor People’s Campaign, and discuss continuing this legacy today. There will be music and refreshments. The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival is updating Martin Luther King’s last social action project. Planning began in 2017 >>More


January, 2019

Museum’s Cabin Fever Sunday Talks Begins with Tahawus


Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake (ADKX) has announced their 2019 Cabin Fever Sunday Series, featuring seven events that look deeper into Adirondack history and culture. The first event, Tahawus: Birth of a Hamlet and a Club, is set for January 13, at 1:30 pm. This presentation by a former NL Industries manager, Don Seauvageau, will cover the 1847 to 1947 period at the Hudson River headwaters. The closure of the mining operations at Adirondac in 1855 did not end the activity here. Often referred to as the “Club Era,” the mining works were sold twice and operated >>More