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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

May, 2019

Nominations Sought for Adirondack Preservation Awards


Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the Adirondack Park region, has opened nominations for its 2019 Preservation Awards. For over 23 years, this annual awards program has recognized the sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse of historic structures throughout the region, and highlighted individuals who have promoted historic preservation revitalization efforts in their communities. The awards honor the preservation work of organizations, municipalities, and individuals who make the Adirondack region a better place to live, work, and visit. Preservation projects of all sizes and scopes are eligible for consideration. The deadline for nominations is June 1, 2019. >>More


May, 2019

Historical Pilgrimages to the John Brown’s Farm


Memorial Day weekend is approaching, and along with the “unofficial start of summer,” the Adirondacks will experience its annual influx of vacationers. But in years past, visitors arrived in May for another purpose: a pilgrimage to the John Brown farm in North Elba, New York. At the farm, a wreath would be laid upon the abolitionist’s grave, and the song “John Brown’s Body” was sung. Though John Brown’s efforts in opposing slavery had been honored in various ways since his execution in 1859, these annual pilgrimages by black citizens began only in the 1920s, and were founded by Jesse Max >>More


May, 2019

Elizabethtown Civil War POW Benjamin Hall Talk in Ti


In 1861 Benjamin Hall of Elizabethtown in Essex County was one among many young men who enlisted to fight against the South in the Union Army. His wartime experiences took him to some of the major battlefields of the American Civil War, and finally to the notorious Confederate prisoner of war camp at Andersonville, Georgia. The Ticonderoga Historical Society is set to present a free public program entitled “Through the Gates of Hell: The Civil War Odyssey of Benjamin Hall,” on Friday, May 17 at 7 pm at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle, Ticonderoga. » Continue Reading. View original >>More


May, 2019

Vulcalock: Inventor William Geer’s Industrial Game-Changer


In the northeast corner of New York, just a few miles from where I grew up, is the village of Rouses Point. Lying directly south of Montreal, it has long provided access for rail shipments to U.S. markets. Where the main highway heading west exits the village is an underpass beneath the rails, so road traffic is not impeded by trains, but it’s a different story within the village, where the tracks cross three streets. I loved it as a young boy when my dad got stuck at one of those crossings, which forced us to sit and watch as >>More


May, 2019

A Local Inventor Helped Supply WW1 Gas Masks


Recently on Adirondack Almanack, two inventions of Ogdensburg native William Chauncey Geer (who lived in Potsdam for ten years of his youth) were addressed, one of them a writing implement to replace pens, pencils, and crayons (an idea that was ultimately relegated to oblivion). The other was a highly successful project resulting in a standard golf ball used by professionals for more than two decades. Three of Geer’s other works deeply impacted America and the world. The subject here is the third most prominent among them — the gas mask. Its importance rose unexpectedly to critical levels during the First >>More


April, 2019

In 1969, Citizens Saved the Upper Hudson from Destruction


Fifty springs ago, the Upper Hudson River was conserved as a wild, free flowing river. The Schenectady Gazette’s writer Pete Jacobs reported the news in the April 17, 1969 edition of that newspaper: “Without opposition, the Assembly gave swift approval to legislation prohibiting the construction of the Gooley Dam on the Upper Hudson River, branded by conservationists as a threat to the wild river country.” In addition to Gooley, the bill blocks construction of any reservoirs on the river from Luzerne to its source in the Adirondack Park. The estimated $57 million dam was proposed as a source of water >>More


April, 2019

North Country at Work Event, Exhibit In Plattsburgh


The Clinton County Historical Association has announced an opening reception for the new photo and audio exhibit “Clinton County at Work” will take place Thursday, May 2, from 6 to 8 pm, at the Clinton County Historical Museum, 98 Ohio Avenue, Old Base Museum Campus in Plattsburgh. The exhibit will showcase photos of work in Plattsburgh and Clinton County from the 1800s to the present, plus listening stations where attendees can hear work stories from people in the community. The exhibit will be a feature of the Museum’s Early Industry Gallery for the month of May. For more information, visit >>More


April, 2019

Pete Seeger’s Local Connections; Seeger Centennial Set for Grange Hall


The late folksinger Pete Seeger had a long connection to the North Country, beginning as a 20-year-old member of the Vagabond Puppeteers, according to Whallonsburg Grange board member Mary-Nell Bockman. In the summer of 1939, the group traveled to rural communities all over Upstate New York, including St. Lawrence, Franklin and Clinton counties, performing in support of dairy farmers on strike against the big milk monopolies. Seeger was good friends with the artist Rockwell Kent and his wife, Sally, and visited Asgaard Farm several times. After meeting Adirondack folklorist Marjorie Lansing Porter at a folk festival in Schroon Lake, he >>More


April, 2019

John Brown Day 2019 Planned For May 4th


John Brown Lives! has announced “John Brown Day: A Day of Reflection. A Day of Action.” is set for May 4th, 2019 from 2 to 4 pm, at the John Brown Farm State Historic Site. John Brown Day is a commemoration honoring women and men whose work invokes the passion and conviction of the 19th-century abolitionist who dedicated his life to the cause of liberation. This year’s awardees are: Dr. Barbara Ransby, professor of African American Studies, Gender and Women’s Studies, and History at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) where she directs the campus-wide Social Justice Initiative. Barbara >>More


April, 2019

Ticonderoga’s Legacy Subject of New Exhibit at Fort Ti


Fort Ticonderoga has announced a new exhibit, “Ticonderoga, A Legacy,” which explores the tradition of Ticonderoga through popular and military culture over two centuries, including the U.S. Navy vessels that have borne its name. Fort Ticonderoga holds a premier collections of 18th-century military material and cultural artifacts. In a statement to the press, Fort Ticonderoga curator Matthew Keagle: “This exhibit explores the ways in which Ticonderoga has been evoked, remembered, and memorialized from the end of the Revolution through the end of the 20th century… From Thomas Cole to Thomas Edison, Ticonderoga has captivated and inspired artists and thinkers from >>More