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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

May, 2016

Saranac Lake ‘History Matters’ Speaker Series Expanded


Historic Saranac Lake announces an expanded “History Matters” Speaker Series beginning this month. This new series will feature an event each month for the rest of 2016. The expanded series will include presentations by Dr. Ian Orme on the state of tuberculosis today, Dr. Neil A. Holtzman on Dr. Norman Bethune, and Mary-Nell Bockman on historic preservation in Cuba. Dates for each of the presentations will be announced soon. The series will kick off this Thursday, May 18, with a presentation entitled “Mythbusting the National Register of Historic Places,” which aims to help the owners of historic properties understand the >>More


May, 2016

Free Historic Walking Tours in Potsdam, Ticonderoga, Bluff Point


Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the historic preservation organization for the Adirondack region, will host a series of walking tours this spring in three communities with unique architecture. Free and open to the public, the tours will take place in Potsdam on May 14, Ticonderoga on May 21, and at Clinton Community College at Bluff Point on Lake Champlain on June 4. Participants will join local experts and historians in exploring the distinct styles, materials and building designs, and the fascinating history of these very different Adirondack places. The first two tours, “Potsdam » Continue Reading. The post Free Historic Walking >>More


May, 2016

Warrensburg-Glens Falls Trolley Program, Ceremony May 15


A program on the early 20th century trolley route from Warrensburg to Glens Falls will be presented at the Richards Library in Warrensburg on Sunday, May 15, at 3:30 by Paul Gilchrist, PhD. Warrensburg was the northern terminus of the Hudson Valley Railway’s trolley line from 1902 until 1928. The presentation of photographs, maps, and aerial photos will follow a ceremony unveiling a roadside plaque marking the location of the Schroon River hydroelectric plant that supplied the trolley line The ceremony will be held at 3 pm at the Warrensburg Farmers Market (across from Curtis Lumber on River Street). Refreshments >>More


May, 2016

Aviation History: Air Marking The North Country (Conclusion)


Shortly after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, it was realized that airmarks could be used by enemy planes, so the order was given to remove 2,500 airmarks that stood within 150 miles of the nation’s coasts. Six weeks later, those marks were obliterated, undoing six years of labor—but shortly after, the blanket order was modified. Why? The absence of airmarks was causing military pilot trainees to become lost. The new order allowed airmarks within 50 miles of flight training airfields. The national program resumed after the war, with improved methods (including government-supplied plywood templates for lettering) and greater participation, but >>More


May, 2016

Aviation History: North Country Airmarks


We take navigation for granted today, what with Siri, GPS, radio communications, radar, and services like Google Maps. But imagine you were a pilot in upstate New York back in the 1920s, when aviation was first coming into its own. If you took to the air, as many citizens did, how would you avoid getting lost? The answer quite often was — you probably wouldn’t, and with potentially fatal consequences. Many pilots died in crashes after running out of fuel while trying to find a destination. Other pilots — of postal service airmail planes, and of military aircraft—faced the same >>More


May, 2016

Camp Santanoni: Past, Present, And Future


Steven Engelhart, Executive Director of Adirondack Architectural Heritage, will give a presentation on Camp Santanoni: Past, Present and Future at the Lake George Community Garden Club on May 18th. The Adirondack region of New York State is well known for a rustic style of architecture, best represented by a series of building complexes known as Great Camps. One of the largest of these is Camp Santanoni in Newcomb, Essex County Town. Great Camps were often designed by professionals for wealthy urban clients and were constructed with a variety of natural materials so that they were harmonious with the rugged Adirondack >>More


May, 2016

Exhibit On Explorer Floyd Bennett Opening In Ticonderoga


The Ticonderoga Historical Society opens its third exhibit of the 2016 season this Friday, May 6, at 6:30 pm at the Hancock House. “From the Adirondacks to the Arctic” examines the life of local resident Floyd Bennett, who piloted Admiral Richard E. Byrd on his controversial and historic 1926 flight over the North Pole. Also included in the exhibit is a broader discussion of local connections to exploration, including the USS Ticonderoga’s (CVS14) role in spacecraft recovery. The ship participated in the Apollo 16 and 17 and Skylab programs during the early 1970s. The program is free and the public >>More


April, 2016

POW Labor Camps in the Adirondacks


The word Adirondack calls to mind many things — natural beauty, family playground, sporting opportunities, colorful history — but nothing so dark as prisoner-of-war host. Yet during the last world war (let’s hope it was the last), followers of Hitler and Mussolini populated the North Country. Volumes have been written about the suffering endured in POW camps, but for countries adhering to the Geneva Conventions, there was a clear set of rules to follow. Among them was that prisoners must receive adequate provisions and supplies (food, clothing, living quarters), and if put to work, they must be paid. During World >>More


April, 2016

Historic Saranac Lake Seeks Roaring Twenties Artifacts


Historic Saranac Lake is seeking the community’s help as the organization creates a new museum exhibit on the roaring twenties. The exhibit, titled, “A Grand Hotel” will feature artifacts of the 1920s. Historic Saranac Lake staff is hoping that community members will help by loaning artifacts for the exhibit. “We are seeking items of clothing, jewelry, and other artifacts that are of the time period,” said Public Programs Coordinator Chessie Monks-Kelly. “We are particularly interested in items connected with local hotels of the 1920s.” The exhibit is projected to open in late 2016. It’s expected to incorporate local history, images, >>More


April, 2016

Champlain Canal Region Gateway Visitors Center Planned


At a recent Saratoga County Board of Supervisors meeting, Mechanicville Town Supervisor and Historic Hudson – Hoosic Rivers Partnership Chair Tom Richardson unveiled the design of a new regional visitors center that is to be constructed near Fort Hardy Park in the Village of Schuylerville. The Champlain Canal Region Gateway Visitors Center is hoped to serve as a catalyst for sustainable tourism development and community revitalization in Rensselaer, Saratoga and Washington counties and to introduce locals and travelers alike to the historically significant and culturally unique destinations in the Champlain Canal Region of Lakes to Locks Passage. Construction of the >>More