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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

June, 2016

Chapman Museum Talk On Stereo View Photographers


The Chapman Museum will host a talk on stereo view photographers, “Not Stoddard: Stereoviews,” on Tuesday, June 21 at 7 pm. People often mistakenly assume that S. R. Stoddard was the only landscape photographer in the region, but he was just one of several who produced stereographs in the mid-to-late 19th century. Presented by Bob Bayle and Tim Weidner, this program will feature 90+ stereo views by George W. Conkey, George S. Irish, A. Orr & Son, L.H. Fillmore of Ticonderoga and others, along with biographical information and other examples of their landscape photography. Included are » Continue Reading. The >>More


June, 2016

Fort Ticonderoga Offering Specialty Tours This Summer


Visitors to Fort Ticonderoga will be able to immerse themselves in the history and natural beauty at the Fort during guided specialty tours this summer. Participants can witnesses the power of artillery during the Guns by Night tour; join the Soldier for an Evening program to enlist with your family and friends in the Continental Army; discover the history within the walls of the 1826 Historic Pavilion house during the Pavilion Promenade tour; and enjoy a sunset cruise aboard Fort Ticonderoga’s Vessel Carillon to discover why Lake Champlain is one of America’s most historic waterways. Pavilion Promenade Fort Ticonderoga’s Curator >>More


June, 2016

The Babbie Rural and Farm Learning Museum


In the northeast corner of New York State, the first weekend in June features Museum Days, during which 16 facilities in Clinton County offer free admission. We were among many who appeared as special guests on both days, offering our books for sale and visiting with attendees, which meant talking a lot about “the good old days.” From that experience, I can assure everyone that a trip to the Babbie Rural & Farm Learning Museum in Peru, where we spent Saturday, is a great idea from several perspectives. As a museum, it’s a real pleasure, and for children and adults >>More


June, 2016

Farrand Benedict’s Abandoned Newcomb-Long Lake Canal


Farrand Benedict, “Professor B,” surveyor and professor of mathematics and engineering at the University of Vermont in Burlington wrote a proposal for a canal across the Adirondacks in 1846. His plan was to use the Black River Canal with its connection to the Erie Canal at Rome and build a railroad from Boonville, on the Black River Canal, to Old Forge. He was then going to utilize the Fulton Chain of Lakes, Raquette Lake, Long Lake, the Raquette River and the Saranac Lakes with various lock systems, dams, and inclines to the Saranac River for canal boat traffic. » Continue >>More


June, 2016

Fort Ticonderoga Focusing Season Around The Year 1777


My family makes a point of going to Fort Ticonderoga every summer. Tri-corner hats, fife and drum corps, cannons and muskets surround us. Overlooking a beautiful backdrop of Lake Champlain, Fort Ticonderoga is where every day is re-enactment day. According to Fort Ti President Beth Hill, the curators choose a year from the fort’s history and focus the season’s interactive exhibits, events, and activities around that singular year. This year when we step through the doors of Fort Ticonderoga it will be 1777. “This year we’re retelling that dynamic point in history between the British and American forces,” says Hill. >>More


June, 2016

Sweat And Matt Deja Vu: Another Dickinson Center Manhunt


Early June marks the one-year anniversary of one of the biggest crime stories in the Adirondack region during the past century. The final days of the manhunt for Richard Matt and David Sweat played out in northern Franklin County, focusing mostly on Malone and the large forest south of the village. By coincidence, one of the biggest crime stories of the 1800s unfolded in the same area and shared some key components: murderers on the loose, a manhunt, and Dickinson Center. Both stories rocked a sparsely populated region, where little of consequence ever seemed to happen. It began in the >>More


June, 2016

Farrand Benedict: Crossing The Adirondacks


A few years ago I learned of a fascinating but rather forgotten individual in Adirondack history. Along with his slightly older mentor Ebenezer Emmons and his younger contemporary Verplanck Colvin, he was among the first to accurately survey much of the Adirondacks. His name was Farrand Benedict. Farrand Northrop Benedict was born in New Jersey in 1803, the oldest of seven. His parents died in the early 1830s and he became something of a father figure for his younger siblings. Graduating from Hamilton College in 1823, Benedict studied law and engineering and taught surveying and mathematics in Virginia and in >>More


June, 2016

2016 Adirondack Coast Museum Days This Weekend


The Adirondack Coast Cultural Alliance (ACCA) again celebrates Museum Days throughout the Adirondack Coast from June 4-5, 2016, inviting visitors and residents to explore the area’s wealth of museums, galleries, and cultural organizations. For these two days, participating locations will offer free admission, including demonstrations, exhibits, hands-on activities, and more. As the backdrop for many historical events and happenings, lakeside villages, charming hamlets and the historic city of Plattsburgh, the Adirondack Coast offers visitors the opportunity to relive some of the most pivotal moments in our country’s history. 17 Participating locations include: · Alice T. Miner Museum · Anderson Falls >>More


May, 2016

Dannemora Escapee Jack Williams: At First, Too Big to Succeed


As the one-year anniversary of the infamous Dannemora prison break approaches, here’s the story of an inmate linked to a pair of unusual breakouts, excerpted from my book, Escape from Dannemora. Despite media stories claiming early on that Richard Matt and David Sweat were the first-ever escapees from Clinton Prison, some in the past did it in even more spectacular fashion, and overall, hundreds managed to escape under various circumstances. Among them was Jack Williams, a participant in two Clinton exits involving unusual components featured in no other Dannemora escapes. Williams was sentenced to Clinton in January 1875, and six >>More


May, 2016

Losing a Dear Friend and Valued Historian


Lyon Mountain is mourning the loss of an important community member, one who also meant very much personally to me and my wife, Jill Jones. Rita Kwetcian, 85, passed away late last Thursday. Recently, when caring for her home became too difficult, she moved to 260 Lake Street: A Senior Resort Community in Rouses Point. Otherwise, her entire life was spent in Lyon Mountain, which happens to be the subject of my first book published through our new company twelve years ago. Back in 1980, I had interviewed more than a dozen Lyon Mountain residents, most of them former iron >>More