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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

January, 2016

Censorship: The Great Comic Book Crisis


History can be entertaining, educating, and eye-opening. For example, read the next two paragraphs, and insert the same term (singular or plural as appropriate) to fill in every blank, choosing one of two options: video game or computer. “Give a child a ________ and he will sit with his nose in it instead of getting out and playing with other children, or entertaining himself by tinkering, building, or joining the family group at whatever they are doing. You can’t even make a dent on the consciousness of a child engrossed in a ________. He may hear the sound of your >>More


January, 2016

Charles Redfield: Newspaper Ink Ran Through His Veins


The Malone Telegram, recently passing the 110th anniversary of its founding (December 9), was the brainchild of Charles M. Redfield, who was cautioned back in 1905 that starting a daily newspaper in a small city with two established weeklies (the Palladium and the Farmer) was foolhardy. But Redfield forged ahead, confident that the response received in advance from advertisers would support the venture — and he was right. For those who probe newspaper archives while researching historical topics, people like Charles Redfield are important and much appreciated. In that regard, Redfield’s efforts were vital in a number of communities prior >>More


January, 2016

A Historic Defeat For Forest Preserve Exploiters


During his years as a senior advisor to many younger Adirondack conservationists, Paul Schaefer told some interesting stories. He witnessed the following incident in the New York State Legislature in 1953, when he was about 45-years-old, at the height of his effectiveness as a conservation organizer. The following story is about passage of what was called the Ostrander Amendment, an amendment to Article 14, Section 1 – the “forever wild clause” – of » Continue Reading. The post A Historic Defeat For Forest Preserve Exploiters appeared first on The Adirondack Almanack.


January, 2016

A Historic Defeat For Forest Preserve Exploiters


During his years as a senior advisor to many younger Adirondack conservationists, Paul Schaefer told some interesting stories. He witnessed the following incident in the New York State Legislature in 1953, when he was about 45-years-old, at the height of his effectiveness as a conservation organizer. The following story is about passage of what was called the Ostrander Amendment, an amendment to Article 14, Section 1, the “forever wild clause” in the New » Continue Reading. The post A Historic Defeat For Forest Preserve Exploiters appeared first on The Adirondack Almanack.


December, 2015

A North Country Doctor Provides the Breath of Life


Of the many great stories about old country doctors, one of my favorites happened in the North Country just a few minutes south of Plattsburgh. The doctor’s name was Isaac Hutinac Patchen. His grandfather, Claude Hutinac, married a woman whose surname was Patchen. Their son, Stephen (Isaac’s father), fought in five Revolutionary War battles and endured the terrible suffering at Valley Forge. Following the war, he assumed his mother’s surname, and family members henceforth were known as Patchens. Isaac Patchen was born around 1793, and at age 20 he began medical training. At the time, he lived in Vermont’s Lake >>More


December, 2015

Harrietstown Votes To Save The Rails


The Harrietstown Town Board voted Thursday night in favor of keeping the local railroad tracks in place, but it’s uncertain what effect the resolution will have on a state proposal to remove the tracks between Tupper Lake and Lake Placid. On a motion by Councilman Howard Riley, the board voted 4-0 to support keeping the tracks. The resolution says the rail line provides “a positive impact on the area.” Harrietstown includes the village of Saranac Lake, whose depot is used by two local businesses: Adirondack Scenic Railroad, which runs tourist trains to and from Lake Placid, and Rail Explorers USA, >>More


December, 2015

Pro Tip: Don’t Drive Big Rigs On Snowmobile Trails


Today marks a strange anniversary. On December 15, 1973, Canadian Charbot Germain attempted to drive his tractor-trailer from Stony Creek to Utica on a snowmobile trail. It didn’t go well. It started out as tales of lost Adirondack visitors often do, with directions from a local. It was suggested that Germain could shorten his trip by taking Route 8 from the Northway toward North Creek. He found himself instead in Stony Creek, headed down the rough Harrisburg Road in the dark. Harrisburg Road was once a town road through what is now the Wilcox Lake Wild Forest and on to >>More


December, 2015

Great Camp Santanoni Wins NYS Preservation Award


Camp Santanoni, the National Historic Landmark Great Camp in Newcomb, is the recipient of a 2015 New York State Historic Preservation Award from the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Three organizations that have worked together to preserve it – Adirondack Architectural Heritage (AARCH), the Town of Newcomb, and the  Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) – accepted the award at a recent ceremony at the State Capitol. The annual New York State Historic Preservation Awards honor excellence in the preservation and revitalization of New York’s historic and cultural resources. “We are delighted by this recognition of Camp Santanoni and the strong partnership that continues to » Continue >>More


December, 2015

Bear Grease: Adirondack Slickum


Trivia question #1: Can you identify the source of the following song lyrics snippet? “Pearl, Pearl, Pearl, come be my loving girl; Don’t you marry Lester Flatt, He slicks his hair with possum fat, Change your name to Mrs. Earl Scruggs.” Trivia question #2: What is the term applied to doilies that once appeared so often on the backs of chairs and sofas? (Or for you old-timers, on the backs of davenports.) Trivia question #3: What was the purpose of those doilies? The three questions and two of the answers are tenuously related to last week’s piece on Allen’s famous >>More


December, 2015

Allen’s Bear Fight Up in Keene


If you love Adirondack legend and lore, you’ll love this gem of a poem that first appeared in 1846. Since then it has appeared in print several times, often with revisions, and with the removal of certain stanzas. It’s the exciting story of a man-versus-bear encounter. The man was Anson Allen, whose colorful past included a fifteen-year stint as owner/editor of the Keeseville Herald, the village’s first newspaper. After moving to Westport in the early 1840s, he edited the Essex Co. Times and Westport Herald for four years. He later published a monthly titled The Old Settler, covering stories and >>More