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Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

March, 2019

Comments Sought on Crown Point Management Plan


The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and the Office of Parks Recreation and Historic Preservation (State Parks) are preparing a Unit Management Plan (UMP) for both the Crown Point State Historic Site and the Crown Point Campground and Day Use Area. Public comments are sought on the UMP, which will address the future management of both properties, including 440-acres along the shores of Lake Champlain. A public meeting to start the planning process will be held on Thursday, March 28, at 6 pm in the auditorium of the Crown Point State Historic Site Museum, 21 Grandview Drive, >>More


March, 2019

Gouverneur’s Rhoda Fox Graves, NYS Political Trailblazer


Bucking the odds is a common theme of Walter-Mitty-type fantasies — overcoming daunting obstacles to become a winner, or a hero at some level. Few of us actually live the dream, but sometimes it happens, and during Women’s History Month, an incredible North Country example comes to mind: Rhoda F. Graves of Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County. The extreme unlikelihood of her becoming a historic figure in state politics makes her story all the more compelling. And the details are amazing. Extreme unlikelihood? Well, consider that for the first two-thirds of her life, the groundbreaking events of the final third >>More


March, 2019

The Other Milhollands: John and Vida


In celebration of Women’s History Month, the Warren County Historical Society will host “The Other Milhollands: John and Vida” on Wednesday, March 27, at 7 pm in Glens Falls. Managing Director of the Ticonderoga Historical Society Diane O’Connor will be the presenter. John E. Milholland, born in 1860, was a journalist, politician, inventor and publisher, who helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). He was an owner of the Ticonderoga Sentinel newspaper and a key progressive figure of the early 1900s. Vida Milholland was born in 1888 and, while not as well-known as her sister, >>More


March, 2019

Remembering Jackie Archer: A North Country Inspiration (Conclusion)


At Plattsburgh’s Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Celebration in 1990, Chairperson Vivian Papson shared a personal recollection of Jackie Archer with the Press-Republican’s Anne Smith: “The first time I made contact with Jackie was in 1987. My introduction to her was a firm yet musical voice on the phone saying, ‘I’m Jacqueline Archer. I live in Plattsburgh and I think that this community needs to have a way to celebrate Dr. King’s birthday. I would like to organize a commemorative gathering; would you be interested in working with me?’ Everyone is very proud of Jackie. She is confined >>More


March, 2019

Rogers’ Rangers, Unique Exhibit, At Ticonderoga


Fort Ticonderoga has announced a 1758 Battle on Snowshoes reenactment is set for Saturday, March 9, 2019. The event recreates the fight between Robert Rogers’ rangers, and a mixed French force of Native American Warriors, Canadians, and French Army soldiers on March 13, 1758. Major Robert Rogers force of both volunteers from the 27th foot, and his own rangers headed out on an extended scout from Fort Edward along Lake George, following an attack on a similar patrol from Captain Israel Putnam’s Connecticut rangers. Hiking on snowshoes due to the three feet of snow, the tracks of Roger’s force were >>More


March, 2019

New Edition of Hiking History Tome ‘Forest and Crag’ Published


Thirty years after its initial publication, Forest and Crag: A History of Hiking, Trail Blazing, and Adventure in the Northeast Mountains has been republished in an anniversary edition (SUNY Press, 2019). Laura and Guy Waterman’s book is a history of the love affair with the mountains of the northern forests from the Catskills and the Adirondacks of New York to the Green Mountains of Vermont, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and the mountains of Maine. Forest and Crag  – a true tome of almost 900 pages, including an index – includes the struggles of settlers in the Northern Forest; >>More


February, 2019

Jackie Archer: A North Country Inspiration (Part 3)


In early 1967, Jackie Archer, president of Plattsburgh’s NAACP chapter, twice addressed the Beekmantown PTA, once on the subject of teen drinking, and later about the importance of maintaining mental health. When Black Power stories filled the media, she gave interviews to the press, explaining that whites needn’t fear violence. “They think Negroes want to take over, but they only want the rights that have been promised them.” she was quoted saying. “Some laws have helped the status of the Negro… but are only a scratch on the surface. If the men in Newark or Detroit had jobs they would >>More


February, 2019

Warren Co Historical Society Names Leadership


The Warren County Historical Society (WCHS) offers historical programs, a Resource Center, a Book and Gift Shop, historical and genealogical research, archives and collections, the quarterly newsletter Pastimes, museum displays, and historic preservation advocacy. The Society is headquartered at 50 Gurney Lane, in Queensbury where a new, permanent exhibit, “Warren County 360: Celebrating Place and People,” is planned for Summer 2019. The Society has a membership of 175 and is funded by memberships, donations, grants, and fundraisers. Society officers for 2019 are: Co-Presidents – Wayne Wright and Dr. Stan Cianfarano; Vice President – Judy Melkonian; Secretary – Marianne Moran; Treasurer >>More


February, 2019

Jackie Archer: North Country Civil Rights Leader (1964)


In 1964, Jackie Archer had several irons in the fire. She was a member of the Beekmantown PTA and was very active in several religious capacities as secretary of the Board of Christian Education of the First Baptist Church; a member of the church’s Guild and Missionary Society; a substitute Sunday school teacher; and, in June, she became Recording Secretary for the Clinton County Council of Churches. Much of her time, however, was devoted ongoing issues of concerned to the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and its leader Paul Lewis: job and >>More


February, 2019

My First Trout and The Rainmakers


My advice to nine-year-old wanna-be trout anglers is: “Do not wear a sweater.” Repeat: “Do not wear a sweater.” My earliest trout fishing days in and around Bakers Mills in today’s Siamese Ponds Wilderness Area were frustrating because my own fishhook invariably caught mainly my sweater. And we mostly used night crawlers not artificial flies then. Better to wear something less adept at snagging stray hooks. Try thick vinyl, maybe. I was considered too young to carry a knife of my own. To resume fishing once I snagged my own sweater, I had to plead with Cub Schaefer to stop >>More