FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

August, 2016

A Walking Tour of the Plattsburgh Barracks Saturday


On Saturday, August 20th, the Clinton County Historical Association (CCHA) will be partnering with City of Plattsburgh Historian John Krueger to offer a Walking Tour of the historic Plattsburgh Barracks. Starting the tour with the 1609 discovery of Lake Champlain, the tour will explore Lake Champlain’s military history that led to the Battle of Plattsburgh, paving the way for what is known today as the Plattsburgh Barracks/Post or, as to most locals, the Old Base. Once housing the Army, Navy and Air Force, the Plattsburgh Barracks is a monument to the Plattsburgh’s military past. The tour leaves » Continue Reading. >>More


August, 2016

Fort Covington’s Big Bill Palmer, Watertown Football Star


In 1903, after winning a national championship with the Michigan Wolverines college football team during the previous season, Fort Covington native Big Bill Palmer was working in Chester, Massachusetts. In subsequent years, homesickness, financial issues, and the supposed need to care for his ill mother were reasons cited by reporters seeking to explain his decision to leave the University of Michigan. The real issue, however, was his status as an amateur athlete. At the time, colleges were cracking down on the use of athletes who were considered professionals, and after winning the national title, Michigan discovered that Palmer, unbeknownst to >>More


August, 2016

Webb Historical Association Garden Party Thursday


There will be a Garden Party on Thursday, August, 18th from 4 to 7 pm, to benefit the Town of Webb Historical Association on the grounds of the Moose River House Bed and Breakfast overlooking the Moose River. The evening will be host by H. Stuart deCamp and Jimmy Ortiz. The event will be dedicated to William Seward Webb – the namesake of the Town of Webb.  Webb, along with his wife Lila Osgood Vanderbuilt, acquired over 200,000 acres of land in the Adirondacks, and owned a notable railroad. The Webbs established Nehasane Park, a 40,000 acre private preserve located >>More


August, 2016

Bobcat Ranney and Howard Zahniser: An Exchange of Letters


In Summer 1946, at the invitation of Paul and Carolyn Schaefer, Howard and Alice Zahniser and family made their first trip to the Adirondacks, from their home in Maryland where Howard had begun work with The Wilderness Society. Zahnie, as he was known, had met Paul Schaefer and Schaefer’s mentor John Apperson that February at the 1946 North American Wildlife Conference in New York City. There, Schaefer and Apperson showed their film about dam threats to Forest Preserve wilderness in the western Adirondacks. It was Wilderness Society policy that any threat to wilderness must be considered a national issue. Accordingly, >>More


August, 2016

Adirondack History: Old Wooden Water Pipes


When you turn on your kitchen faucet you probably don’t give it much thought, yet it’s a marvel of modern history. For centuries to get water into the house it was necessary to fill your buckets from a fast moving stream and then lug them home. Later you might have filled them from a well or cistern, but still had the chore of lugging them back to the house. Every drop of water you wanted for drinking, cooking or washing had to be transported this way and it was a seemingly endless task. In winter, you might have to carry >>More


August, 2016

Crown Point Encampment, Battle Reenactment This Weekend


Crown Point State Historic Site will host its annual French and Indian War Encampment on August 13 and 14, 2016. This is the largest event of the year at the site and features authentically clad French, British, and Native American participants camped among the fort ruins. Guests to the camp are able to interact with the participants portraying various people of Crown Point’s past and also have the opportunity to purchase some of the 18th century wares produced and exhibited by artisans and merchants. At 2 pm each day battle reenactments will be held as the public is invited to >>More


August, 2016

Legendary North Country Athlete Big Bill Palmer


Largely forgotten due to the passage of time, Fort Covington native William “Big Bill” Palmer is one of the most successful athletes ever born in the North Country. And yet the period during which he reached remarkable heights at two levels of the same sport lasted just over two years. Even more surprising is that he played on a team still recognized today as legendary in the world of college athletics. Born in 1875 to William and Catherine Palmer on a Fort Covington farm in northern Franklin County, New York, Bill displayed unusual athletic ability at a young age. At >>More


August, 2016

259th Anniversary Fort William Henry Surrender


Each year the Surrender of Fort William Henry is honored by a wreath laying ceremony, a reenactment and the reading of the official Articles of Surrender on the museum’s lawn overlooking Lake George.  According to Fort William Henry Museum Director Melody Viele, this annual anniversary focuses on the importance of the French and Indian War. “The Colonies learned to fight during the French and Indian War,” says Viele. “It was the first event to unite the colonists. They joined together to fight the French. Later the British tried to recoup their expenses through taxes, which inadvertently led to the Revolutionary War.” This >>More


August, 2016

The Last of the Mohicans Revisited


“It was in this scene of strife and bloodshed that the incidents we shall attempt to relate occurred, during the third year of the war which England and France last waged for the possession of a country that neither was destined to retain.” Thus begins James Fenimore Cooper’s Last of the Mohicans. Published in 1826, it was the first novel based on America’s own, relatively recent history. In August, 1757, after enduring a siege that had lasted six days, outnumbered three to one and deprived of any hopes of re-enforcements, Lt. Commander » Continue Reading. The post The Last of >>More


August, 2016

The Rising Elevation of Stillwater Mountain


At an elevation of 2,264 feet, Stillwater Fire Tower in northern Herkimer County has never been a beacon for tourists. It’s not even modestly high compared to the 46 Adirondack peaks over 4,000 feet. Since 1912, Fire Observers on Stillwater Mountain needed a high tolerance for isolation and resistance to boredom. Until the fire tower closed in 1988, the annual number visitors ranged from 145 to it’s record of 618. Before the mid-‘50s, when the Big Moose Road was completed, the only access to the tower trail was by » Continue Reading. The post The Rising Elevation of Stillwater Mountain >>More