FacebookTwitterInstagram Youtube
Adirondack Explorer

Archive for the ‘history’ Category

February, 2017

St Lawrence County World War One Centennial Exhibit


To mark the centennial of World War One the Historical Association in Canton is seeking to recognize St. Lawrence County contributions to the war effort as well as the war’s impact on local families. In honor of the centennial of the United States’ entry into WWI in 1917, the Association has opened a new exhibition, “Come On!: Posters and Portraits of World War I.” The exhibit shows posters for war bonds alongside photographic portraits of local soldiers. Most of the photos are unidentified, and the museum welcomes visitors who recognize a friend or family member to help identify them. The SLCHA’s >>More


February, 2017

Crown Point’s Overlooked Role in Freeing Boston, 1776


A few weeks ago in this space appeared the story of Gershom Beach’s remarkable 24-hour recruiting hike in Vermont, rounding up Green Mountain Boys to join their leader, Ethan Allen, in capturing Fort Ticonderoga on the New York side of Lake Champlain. In the end, their combined efforts played a critical role in George Washington’s American troops driving the British from Boston, for the armaments he used came from Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Men serving under Colonel Henry Knox completed the delivery, carrying them south to Albany and east to Boston. Typically shortchanged in that famous story is the >>More


February, 2017

Louis Seymour: French Louie Talk In Utica Saturday


On Saturday, February 25 at 1 pm, Regional historian Peter Hemmerich will offer an informative perspective on Louis “French Louie” Seymour at the Oneida County History Center. Hemmerich will discuss Seymour’s life and travels, touching upon his journeys into Oneida County and the Mohawk Valley. French Louie is a well-known character in Adirondack folklore who is remembered as the eccentric hermit who resided in the wilderness of the West Canada Lakes region during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Louie spent most of his life as a guide, trapper, and woodsmen, and only came to town once or twice a >>More


February, 2017

Presentation on Stoddard’s 2,000-Mile Canoe Trip Tuesday


Tuesday, February 21, at 1 pm at the Chapman Museum in Glens Falls, Chapman Curator Jillian Mulder will present an illustrated talk about Seneca Ray Stoddard’s multi-year trip up the Atlantic coast in a canoe entitled Stoddard’s Adventure on “The Atlantis.” Over the course of five years, from 1883-1887, Glens Falls photographer Seneca Ray Stoddard completed a five stage journey by canoe. Stoddard and a companion traveled down the Hudson River to New York City and northward up the Atlantic coast, finally ending at the Bay of Fundy, Canada. It was the first time a small craft of that size >>More


February, 2017

Ugly History of North Country Nationalism Offers Lessons For Today


Goodness has long been an admirable part of our identity as Americans. It is evident at the national level in our response when natural disasters strike here or abroad. Closer to home, we see it manifested daily in our own Adirondacks and foothills, where people donate, volunteer, and reach out to help others. Our foundation as small-town folk is one of welcoming, caring, sharing. Along with that comes the knowledge that we’re also lucky to be Americans, lucky to not have been born in some other country where things are much different. Many of the lessons we learned in school >>More


February, 2017

Saranac Lake Book Launch On Susan B. Anthony’s Birthday Wednesday


On February 15, 2017 at 7 pm, celebrate Susan B. Anthony’s 196th Birthday with a book launch at Lake Flower Landing (421 Lake Flower Avenue) in Saranac Lake. Sandra Weber’s new book, The Woman Suffrage Statue: A History of the Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony in the U.S. Capitol (McFarland & Company, 2016), recounts the jubilation, condemnation, and hullabaloo surrounding the Portrait Monument to Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. The neoclassical work of art seemed destined to provoke controversy; it was an unconventional form with a strange unfinished appearance, composed of >>More


February, 2017

The Revolutionary War Ride of Gershom Beach


Here’s the opening stanza from “Paul Revere’s Ride”: Listen my children and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere, On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five; Hardly a man is now alive Who remembers that famous day and year. Less than a month later, at a different location but with the same cadence, Longfellow could have written: In Vermont and New York they should surely teach About the amazing walk of Gershom Beach. On the tenth of May, in Seventy-five; Lake Champlain folks now alive Have no idea of the towns he reached. Longfellow’s poem, written in >>More


February, 2017

The Crego Family: Three Generations of Adirondack Guides


In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, three generations of the Crego family worked as wilderness guides in the Western Adirondacks. Along the way, they raised families, worked for prominent employers, adapted to new forms of transportation, and helped lay the groundwork for the conservation movement in New York State. Paul S. Crego (1828-1905) The first member of the family to be associated with the Adirondacks was Paul Shoreham Crego who was a son of Samuel H. Crego (1793-1861) and Lucy Daniels (1792-1868?). The Crego family had migrated from Vermont to Lewis County in the early 1800s and Paul >>More


February, 2017

1980 Lake Placid Olympics Scoreboard Being Replaced


The scoreboard that chronicled historical moments and the United States’ improbable run to the 1980 Olympic Winter Games gold medal will be lit one more time on February 6th at 1 pm, before being taken down to make way for a new Daktronics video board. The scoreboard has hung high from the center ice rafters of the Olympic 1980 Herb Brooks Arena in Lake Placid for the last 37 years.  In addition to its duties during the 1980 Olympics, the scoreboard has registered NHL, minor, junior, collegiate, high school and tournament scores. One of the four panels is being turned >>More


February, 2017

Billy Richards, ‘the Armless Wonder’: Playing the Hand You’re Dealt


While researching a pair of books on North Country iron mining, I unexpectedly became privy to tragedies that many families faced. Mining accidents were frequent and involved excessive violence, often resulting in death. Victims were sometimes pancaked — literally — by rock falls, and their remains were recovered with scraping tools. Others were blown to pieces by dynamite explosions, usually as the result of, in mining parlance, “hitting a missed hole.” The “missed hole” nomenclature refers to unexploded dynamite charges accidentally detonated later by another miner when his drill made contact with the material or caused a spark. The resulting >>More